Ireland's central source for Open Access health research 


Lenus, the Irish Health Research repository is the leading source for Irish research in health and social care.  The Lenus collections include peer reviewed journal articles, grey literature, dissertations, reports and conference presentations. Lenus contains the publications of the Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) and the collected research output of over 130 health organisations past and present are all freely accessible. 

Submit Your Research to Lenus 

If you are an Irish Researcher or have conducted research in an Irish Institution or Health Organisation you can add your published research to Lenus. Submitted articles must be available in Open Access format or the publishers policy permit author self archiving. Advice on Open Access publishing and publishers policies are available on the 'Open Access Publishing Guide' and 'publishers' policies' pages available on the left.     

SUBMIT NOW 


Winners of the HSE Open Access Research Awards 2018 

Thank You to everyone who submitted an entry to the annual HSE Open Access Research awards.

Winners were announced at the awards ceremony held in Dr Steevens Library on December 7th. 

Category Winners 

      

Congratulations to all the winners of this years' awards.  


Sign up for Lenus Spotlights 

The Lenus spotlights email newsletter delivers the pick of recent Lenus articles and reports plus news on open access events directly to your inbox.  

SIGN UP 

   

  • Annular Rupture During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Predictors, Management and Outcomes.

    Coughlan, J J; Kiernan, Thomas; Mylotte, Darren; Arnous, Samer (International Cardiology Review, 2018-09-01)
    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the treatment of choice in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are either inoperable or at high risk for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement. Recent data have also shown favourable outcomes in patients deemed to be at intermediate operative risk, which expands the application of this novel technology. Despite its success, TAVI has been associated with rare life-threatening complications. Of these, aortic annular rupture is considered to be the most devastating. Advances in pre-procedural screening and patient selection have reduced the incidence of annular rupture. When this complication occurs, early recognition and prompt management are essential. This article is intended to provide a comprehensive review of the predictors, management and clinical outcomes of aortic annular rupture.
  • Canis Caveat (Beware of the Dog) - Septic Shock Due To Capnocytophaga Canimorsus Contracted From A Dog Bite

    O’Shaughnessy, SM; Broderick, L; Walsh, J; Schaffer, K; Westbrook, A; St. Vincent’s University Hospital (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-11)
    We describe the case of a 61-year-old immunocompetent male who developed septic shock and multiorgan failure due to Capnocytophaga canimorsus (C. canimorsus) bloodstream infection, sustained from a dog bite. Unusually, this patient developed acute liver failure and splenic infarction in addition to many of the better-known clinical sequelae of C. canimorsus infection.
  • Attitudes and Knowledge of Healthcare Professionals Regarding Organ Donation. A Survey of the Saolta University Health Care Group.

    Umana, E; Grant, O; Curran, E; May, P; Mohamed, A; O’Donnell, J; University Hospital Galway (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-11)
    Organ donation saves lives and healthcare professionals (HCPs) play a vital role in that process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes and level of knowledge of HCPs regarding organ donation. An online anonymous self-administered questionnaire containing 40 questions on organ donation using google forms was created. The survey was distributed to HCPs working in the Saolta University Health Care Group. A hundred and thirty-nine responses were received giving a response rate of 11.8%. HCPs willingness to donate their organs was at 93% compared to 97% willing to receive a transplant. More HCPs understood or had knowledge of the term donation after brain death (64%) than donation after circulatory death (49%). HCPs working in intensive care knew more about the management of brain dead donors than other specialties (p<0.0001). Over 60% of HCPs when asked either disagreed or strongly disagreed with the adequacy of training in organ donation and transplant. Overall, HCPs surveyed had positive attitudes towards organ donation but there was a lack of knowledge particularly among non-intensive care professionals. This study highlights the need to increase awareness along with implementation of educational programmes among HCPs regarding organ donation and transplant.
  • Operative Management of Perinatal Lumbar Disc Herniation and Cauda Equina Syndrome: A Case Series

    Ahern, DP; Gibbons, D; Dodds, M; Timlin, M; Cassidy, N; Morris, S; Synnott, K; Butler, JS (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-11)
    Perinatal lumbar discectomy for lumbar disc herniation or cauda equina syndrome is a rare clinical scenario. This case series outlines the surgical management of this clinical scenario at a national tertiary referral centre over a 10-year period
  • Temporal trends in hyperuricaemia in the Irish health system from 2006-2014: A cohort study.

    Kumar A U, Arun; Browne, Leonard D; Li, Xia; Adeeb, Fahd; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Fraser, Alexander D; Stack, Austin G; University Hospital Limerick (PLOS ONE, 2018-01-01)
    Elevated serum uric acid (sUA) concentrations are common in the general population and are associated with chronic metabolic conditions and adverse clinical outcomes. We evaluated secular trends in the burden of hyperuricaemia from 2006-2014 within the Irish health system. Data from the National Kidney Disease Surveillance Programme was used to determine the prevalence of elevated sUA in adults, age > 18 years, within the Irish health system. Hyperuricaemia was defined as sUA > 416.4 μmol/L in men and > 339.06 μmol/L in women, and prevalence was calculated as the proportion of patients per year with mean sUA levels above sex-specific thresholds. Temporal trends in prevalence were compared from 2006 to 2014 while general estimating equations (GEE) explored variation across calendar years expressed as odds ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence intervals (CI). From 2006 to 2014, prevalence of hyperuricaemia increased from 19.7% to 25.0% in men and from 20.5% to 24.1% in women, P<0.001. The corresponding sUA concentrations increased significantly from 314.6 (93.9) in 2006 to 325.6 (96.2) in 2014, P<0.001. Age-specific prevalence increased in all groups from 2006 to 2014, and the magnitude of increase was similar for each age category. Adjusting for baseline demographic characteristics and illness indicators, the likelihood of hyperuricemia was greatest for patients in 2014; OR 1.45 (1.26-1.65) for men and OR 1.47 (1.29-1.67) in women vs 2006 (referent). Factors associated with hyperuricaemia included: worsening kidney function, elevated white cell count, raised serum phosphate and calcium levels, elevated total protein and higher haemoglobin concentrations, all P<0.001. The burden of hyperuricaemia is substantial in the Irish health system and has increased in frequency over the past decade. Advancing age, poorer kidney function, measures of nutrition and inflammation, and regional variation all contribute to increasing prevalence, but these do not fully explain emerging trends.

View more