Ireland's central source for Open Access health research 


Lenus, the Irish Health Research repository is the leading source for Irish research in health and social care.  The Lenus collections include peer reviewed journal articles, grey literature, dissertations, reports and conference presentations. Lenus contains the publications of the Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) and the collected research output of over 130 health organisations past and present are all freely accessible. 

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If you are an Irish Researcher or have conducted research in an Irish Institution or Health Organisation you can add your published research to Lenus. Submitted articles must be available in Open Access format or the publishers policy permit author self archiving. Advice on Open Access publishing and publishers policies are available on the 'Open Access Publishing Guide' and 'publishers' policies' pages available on the left.     

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Winners of the HSE Open Access Research Awards 2018 

Thank You to everyone who submitted an entry to the annual HSE Open Access Research awards.

Winners were announced at the awards ceremony held in Dr Steevens Library on December 7th. 

Category Winners 

      

Congratulations to all the winners of this years' awards.  


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  • Over prescribing of antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections; a qualitative study to explore Irish general practitioners' perspectives.

    O'Doherty, Jane; Leader, Leonard F W; O'Regan, Andrew; Dunne, Colum; Puthoopparambil, Soorej Jose; O'Connor, Raymond (BMC Family Practice, 2019-02-14)
    Anti-microbial resistance (AMR) is a global threat to public health and antibiotics are often unnecessarily prescribed for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in general practice. We aimed to investigate why general practitioners (GPs) continue to prescribe antibiotics for ARTIs despite increasing knowledge of their poor efficacy and worsening antimicrobial resistance. We used an explorative qualitative study design. Thirteen GPs were recruited through purposive sampling to represent urban and rural settings and years of experience. They were based in general practices within the Mid-West of Ireland. GPs took part in semi-structured interviews that were digitally audio recorded and transcribed. Three main themes and three subthemes were identified. Themes include (1) non-comprehensive guidelines; how guideline adherence can be difficult, (2) GPs under pressure; pressures to prescribe from patients and perceived patient expectations and (3) Unnecessary prescribing; how to address it and the potential of public interventions to reduce it. GPs acknowledge their failure to implement guidelines because they feel they are less usable in clinical situations. GPs felt pressurised to prescribe, especially for fee-paying patients and in out of hours settings (OOH), suggesting the need for interventions that target the public's perceptions of antibiotics. GPs behaviours surrounding prescribing antibiotics need to change in order to reduce AMR and change patients' expectations.
  • "Do as we say, not as we do?" the lifestyle behaviours of hospital doctors working in Ireland: a national cross-sectional study.

    O' Keeffe, Anthony; Hayes, Blánaid; Prihodova, Lucia (BMC Public Health, 2019-02-11)
    This study was conducted to assess the lifestyle behaviours of a national sample of hospital doctors working in Ireland. We also sought to compare the prevalence of these behaviours in doctors to the general Irish population. This was a national cross-sectional study of a randomised sample of hospital doctors working in Irish publicly funded hospitals and residential institutions. The final cohort consisted of 1749 doctors (response rate of 55%). All hospital specialties were represented except radiology. The following data were collected: sociodemographic data (age, sex), work grade (consultant, trainee) average hours worked over a two-week period, specialty and lifestyle behaviours (smoking, alcohol, physical activity). Lifestyle data for the general population was provided by the Healthy Ireland 2015 study. Half of participants were men (50.5%). Just over half of the sample were consultants (54.3%), with 45.7% being trainees. 9.3% of doctors surveyed were smokers, 88.4% consumed alcohol and 24.5% were physically inactive. Trainees were more likely to smoke and be physically inactive when compared to consultants. Smoking rates amongst doctors were lower than the general population (9.3% -v- 23%). Doctors were more likely to consume alcohol than the general population (88.4% -v- 71.7%) but less likely to engage in binge drinking on a typical drinking occasion (12.8% -v- 39.5%). Doctors were more compliant than the general population with minimum exercise targets (75.5% -v- 70.5%), but less likely to engage in health enhancing physical activity (19.1% -v- 33%). While the prevalence of health behaviours amongst hospital doctors in Ireland compares favourably to the general population, their alcohol consumption and engagement in health enhancing physical activity suggest room for improvement. Continued health promotion and education on the importance of personal health behaviours is essential.
  • Clinical Psychology Today Summer 2018

    Foy, Sean; Galavan, Eoin; Collins, Padraig; School of Psychology, National University of Ireland Galway (School of Psychology, National University of Ireland Galway, 2018-07-01)
  • Combined Patients and Medical Related Cosmetic Breast Cancer Outcomes—A Preferred Approach to Outcomes Assessment

    Sugrue, Michael; Johnston, Alison; Degnim, Amy; Rubio, Isabel T.; Van den Tol, M. Petrouska; Djohan, Risal; Valentine, Mark; Mac Gregor, Geraldine; 1. Breast Centre North West, Letterkenny University Hospital, Donegal, Ireland 2. Donegal Clinical Research Academy, Donegal, Ireland. 3. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, NY, USA. 4. Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitario, Barcelona, Spain. 5&6 University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands (Advances in Breast Cancer Research, 2018-12)
    Introduction: Reducing positive margins and need for re-excision yet maintaining cosmesis is key in breast cancer surgery. This study describes the evaluation of early outcomes of a combined cosmetic assessment programme following breast conservation surgery (BCS). Methods: An ethically approved prospective study was conducted at Letterkenny University Hospital and a 15-month timeframe was chosen. All consecutive patients undergoing conservative breast surgery with complete local excision, from July 2015 to October 2016, were entered into the study. Patients undergoing mastectomy and reconstruction with either implant or autologous tissue were not included. 41 patients undergoing BCS were analysed. Objective and subjective cosmetic evaluations were carried out. Assessments used were the Breast Cancer Conservative Treatment—cosmetic results [BCCT.core 2.0] Software, a panel of 4 experts in breast surgery and the Breast Cancer Treatment Outcome Scale (BCTOS). Demographic and pathological data, breast excision weight, % breast volume excised (BVE), margin positivity, complications and re-excision were documented. Data was expressed as mean and standard deviation for normally distributed data and medians and inter quartile range for non-normal data. Scores were also dichotomised to excellent/good and fair/poor and results were analysed. Results: 41 patients’ mean age is 55 ± 13 years. Mean breast volume was 768.3 cm3 ± 440; BVE weighed 78.6g ± 42.6 (18.9 - 214.4) and %BVE 11.3% ± 5.2% (5.1 - 23.3). Re-excision rate was 2/41 (4.9%) all for positive margins. 0/41 infections or haematomas occurred.

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