• A Web-Based Electronic Neurology Referral System: A Solution for anOverburdened Healthcare System

      Williams, L; O’Riordan, S; McGuigan, C; Hutchinson, M; Tubridy, N (Irish Medical Journal (IMJ), 2012-10)
    • Weight gain as a manageable side effect in psychiatric populations

      Cahill, Dr Michele; Noone, Dr Patricia; Eli Lilly & Co. (2003)
    • Weight management services for adults highlighting the role of primary care

      Hassan, SJ; O’Shea, D (Irish Medical Journal, 2012-12)
    • Westermark's sign of pulmonary embolism--well known but frequently overlooked.

      Tsvetanova, Z; Logan, H (Irish Medical Journal, 2015-01)
      Pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequently a difficult diagnosis because of non-specific symptoms that can lead to misdiagnosis 1 . We report a patient with PE successfully diagnosed and treated, whose CXR showed Westermark’s sign of pulmonary embolism. Westermark’s sign is distal oligaemia in the affected area of the lung due to a reduction in size of vessels distal to a PE 2 . It has a low sensitivity (14%) and high specificity (92%) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism 3 . Its high specificity for PE makes it a sign well worth being aware of and in this case described its early recognition may led to early treatment and to prevention of cardiovascular insult.
    • What are the spondyloarthropathies?

      FitzGerald, Oliver; Maksymowych, Walter P; Dept of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, 4, Ireland. oliver.fitzgerald@ucd.ie (2010-10)
    • What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

      Harewood, G C; Pardi, D S; Hansel, S L; Corr, A E; Aslanian, H; Maple, J; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, harewood.gavin@gmail.com. (2010-07-27)
      BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.
    • What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

      Harewood, G C; Pardi, D S; Hansel, S L; Corr, A E; Aslanian, H; Maple, J; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin,, Ireland. harewood.gavin@gmail.com (2012-02-01)
      BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.
    • What do you think of us? Evaluating patient knowledge of and satisfaction with a psychiatric outpatient service.

      Jabbar, F; Casey, P; Schelten, S L; Kelly, B D; Department of Adult Psychiatry, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, University College Dublin, 62/63 Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland. (2011-03)
      This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with the care they were receiving; examine patients' knowledge of the psychiatric services in general; and identify variables associated with satisfaction.
    • What have shorter working hours for doctors achieved

      Murphy, J F A (Irish Medical Journal, 2011-04)
      The first years after qualification are difficult for all doctors. Itâ s a lot of responsibility for someone in their mid- twenties. The work is hard and complex and it takes time to acquire the ability to translate the theoretical knowledge acquired at medical school into clinical practice. Neal Chatterjee 1 has recently described the initial rawness and impact of hospital life on the new resident. There are ever-lit hallways, the cacophony of overhead pages, near constant bleeps and buzzes and the stale smell of hospital linen. Itâ s a foreign world in which the new doctor encounters daily stressful experiences. The question now being asked is whether it needs to be so daunting. Can the working conditions and the environment be improved?
    • What is my risk of developing cardiovascular disease?

      Graham, Ian M; Cooney, Marie-Therese; Dudina, Alexandra; Squarta, Sophie; Trinity College and Department of Cardiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating National Childrens' Hospital Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland., ian.graham@amnch.ie (2012-02-01)
    • What is new in obstetric antecedents of chronic disease? Best articles from the past year.

      Malone, Fergal D; Rotunda Hospital (2014-04)
      This month, we focus on current research in obstetric antecedents of chronic disease. Dr Malone discusses four recent publications, and each is concluded with a "bottom line" that is the take-home message. The complete reference for each can be found in on this page along with direct links to the abstracts.
    • What is the place of new risk markers in the prediction of cardiovascular disease

      DeBacker, G; Cooney, MT; Graham, IM (European Journal Cardiovascular Prevention Rehabilitation, 2011)
    • What is the role and value of extra-mural medical activity

      Murphy, JFA (Irish Medical Journal, 2013-08-20)
      Presently all Irish doctors, apart from trainees, are in the process of getting their educational activities for the past year in order for enrolment in the new medical competence scheme. The intra-mural component is understandable and makes common sense. It gives an existence to oneâ s daily professional life. It is about meeting with oneâ s colleagues at least once a week to discuss aspects of patient care, review of radiological findings and the presentation of data from recent medical papers. The process is cost neutral, time efficient and beneficial for both patients and doctors. It is an important driver for the audit programme. In addition to its educational value it is good for team building and personal professional development. It may not sound very glamorous but its potential is considerable
    • What is the value of ultrasound soft tissue measurements in the prediction of abnormal fetal growth?

      Farah, N; Stuart, B; Donnelly, V; Rafferty, G; Turner, M; UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. nadine.farah@ucd.ie (2012-02-01)
      Abnormal fetal growth increases the complications of pregnancy not only for the baby but also for the mother. Growth abnormalities also have lifelong consequences. These babies are at increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes and hypertension later in life. It is important to identify these babies antenatally to optimise their clinical care. Although used extensively antenatally to monitor fetal growth, ultrasound has its limitations. Despite the use of more than 50 different formulae to estimate fetal weight, their performance has been poor at the extremes of fetal weight. Over the past 20 years there has been emerging interest in studying fetal soft tissue measurements to improve detection of growth abnormalities. This review paper outlines the value of soft tissue measurements in identifying fetal growth abnormalities, in estimating fetal weight and in managing diabetes mellitus in pregnancy.
    • What models of maternity care do pregnant women in Ireland want?

      Byrne, C; Kennedy, C; O'Dwyer, V; Farah, N; Kennelly, M; Turner, M J; UCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, , Cork St, Dublin 8 (2012-02-01)
      The introduction of new models of care in the Irish maternity services has been recommended by both advocacy groups and strategic reports. Yet there is a dearth of information about what models of care pregnant women want. We surveyed women in early pregnancy who were attending a large Dublin maternity hospital. Demographic and clinical details were recorded from the hospital chart. Of the 501 women, 351 (70%) (352 (70.3%) of women wanted shared antenatal care between their family doctor and either a hospital doctor or midwife. 228 (45.5%) preferred to have their baby delivered in a doctor-led unit, while 215 (42.9%) preferred a midwifery-led unit. Of those 215 (42.9%), 118 (55%) met criteria for suitability. There was minimal demand (1.6%) for home births. Choice was influenced by whether the woman was attending for private care or not. Safety is the most important factor for women when choosing the type of maternity care they want. Pregnant women want a wide range of choices when it comes to models of maternity care. Their choice is strongly influenced by safety considerations, and will be determined in part by risk assessment.
    • What models of maternity care do pregnant women in Ireland want?

      Byrne, C; Kennedy, Cormac; O'Dwyer, V (Irish Medical Journal, 2011-06)
    • What price a diagnosis?

      Lynch, Sally Ann; Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-02-01)
    • What should dental services for people with disabilities be like? Results of an Irish delphi panel survey.

      Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin; Nunn, June; Dougall, Alison; O'Neill, Eunan; McLoughlin, Jacinta; Guerin, Suzanne; Department of Public and Child Dental Health, Dublin Dental University Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. (2014)
      This study aimed to generate prioritised goals for oral health services for people with disabilities as a first step in meeting the need for evidence based oral health services for people with disabilities in Ireland.
    • What we can learn from generational gaps

      Higgins, MF; O'Gorman, C (Irish Medical Journal (IMJ), 2014-02)
      No matter what stage you are in your career, we defy you to deny that you have not had at least one of these thoughts recently - Medical students these days just don't have the respect for their seniors that we had. We need to learn! But when will we get the time! Social media has no place in medical education. Why can't I use my laptop in the hospital? As we moved slowly up the medical career ladder, we have gradually noticed the differences between the generations. These personal observations have been backed by a recent explosion in opinion articles, lectures and research in this area, much of which can help explain the issues and identify the background to the differences in opinion that previously may have frustrated or challenged relationships 1-3