• Characteristics of patients with orofacial granulomatosis.

      McCartan, B E; Healy, C M; McCreary, C E; Flint, S R; Rogers, S; Toner, M E; School of Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin School of Dental Science, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. (2011-10)
      Orofacial granulomatosis has mostly been described in reports of very small numbers of cases. Few large case groups have been described. The aim of this study was to describe the demographics, symptoms, clinical features and laboratory findings in a large cohort of cases.
    • Genome-wide meta-analyses identify multiple loci associated with smoking behavior.

      Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27710, USA. (2010-05)
      Consistent but indirect evidence has implicated genetic factors in smoking behavior. We report meta-analyses of several smoking phenotypes within cohorts of the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium (n = 74,053). We also partnered with the European Network of Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) and Oxford-GlaxoSmithKline (Ox-GSK) consortia to follow up the 15 most significant regions (n > 140,000). We identified three loci associated with number of cigarettes smoked per day. The strongest association was a synonymous 15q25 SNP in the nicotinic receptor gene CHRNA3 (rs1051730[A], beta = 1.03, standard error (s.e.) = 0.053, P = 2.8 x 10(-73)). Two 10q25 SNPs (rs1329650[G], beta = 0.367, s.e. = 0.059, P = 5.7 x 10(-10); and rs1028936[A], beta = 0.446, s.e. = 0.074, P = 1.3 x 10(-9)) and one 9q13 SNP in EGLN2 (rs3733829[G], beta = 0.333, s.e. = 0.058, P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) also exceeded genome-wide significance for cigarettes per day. For smoking initiation, eight SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance, with the strongest association at a nonsynonymous SNP in BDNF on chromosome 11 (rs6265[C], odds ratio (OR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.04-1.08, P = 1.8 x 10(-8)). One SNP located near DBH on chromosome 9 (rs3025343[G], OR = 1.12, 95% Cl 1.08-1.18, P = 3.6 x 10(-8)) was significantly associated with smoking cessation.
    • Management of primary molar infraocclusion in general practice.

      McGeown, Mary; O'Connell, Anne (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2014-08)
      Statement of the problem: Infraoccluded primary molars can be managed in general dental practice but clinicians need to understand when intervention is necessary.