• Generation of a vascularized organoid using skeletal muscle as the inductive source.

      Messina, Aurora; Bortolotto, Susan K; Cassell, Oliver C S; Kelly, Jack; Abberton, Keren M; Morrison, Wayne A; Bernard O'Brien Institute of Microsurgery, St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia. messinaa@svhm.org.au (2005-09)
      The technology required for creating an in vivo microenvironment and a neovasculature that can grow with and service new tissue is lacking, precluding the possibility of engineering complex three-dimensional organs. We have shown that when an arterio-venous (AV) loop is constructed in vivo in the rat groin, and placed inside a semisealed chamber, an extensive functional vasculature is generated. To test whether this unusually angiogenic environment supports the survival and growth of implanted tissue or cells, we inserted various preparations of rat and human skeletal muscle. We show that after 6 weeks incubation of muscle tissue, the chamber filled with predominantly well-vascularized recipient-derived adipose tissue, but some new donor-derived skeletal muscle and connective tissue were also evident. When primary cultured myoblasts were inserted into the chamber with the AV loop, they converted to mature striated muscle fibers. Furthermore, we identify novel adipogenesis-inducing properties of skeletal muscle. This represents the first report of a specific three-dimensional tissue grown on its own vascular supply.
    • Scaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization.

      Burugapalli, Krishna; Thapasimuttu, Anilkumar; Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Yao, Li; Brody, Sarah; Kelly, Jack L; Pandit, Abhay; Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland. (2007-03)
      An intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12).