• Six years' experience with prostaglandin I2 infusion in elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a parallel group observational study in a tertiary referral vascular center.

      Beirne, Chris; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. (Annals of vascular surgery, 2008-11)
      The prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analogue iloprost, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation, has traditionally been utilized in pulmonary hypertension and off-label use for revascularization of chronic critical lower limb ischemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of 72 hr iloprost infusion on systemic ischemia post-open elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (EAAA) surgery. Between January 2000 and 2007, 104 patients undergoing open EAAA were identified: 36 had juxtarenal, 15 had suprarenal, and 53 had infrarenal aneurysms, with a mean maximal diameter of 6.9 cm. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1, with a mean age of 71.9 years. No statistically significant difference was seen between the study groups with regard to age, sex, risk factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, or diameter of aneurysm repaired. All emergency, urgent, and endovascular procedures for aneurysms were excluded. Fifty-seven patients received iloprost infusion for 72 hr in the immediate postoperative period compared with 47 patients who did not. Patients were monitored for signs of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, systemic ischemia, and postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Statistically significantly increased ventilation rates (p=0.0048), pulmonary complication rates (p=0.0019), and myocardial ischemia (p=0.0446) were noted in those patients not receiving iloprost. These patients also had significantly higher renal indices including estimate glomerular filtration rate changes (p=0.041) and postoperative urea level rises (p=0.0286). Peripheral limb trashing was noted in five patients (11.6%) in the non-iloprost group compared with no patients who received iloprost. Increased rates of transfusion requirements and bowel complications were noted in those who did not receive iloprost, with their ICU stay greater than twice that of iloprost patients. All-cause morbidity affected 67% of patients not receiving iloprost compared to 40% who did. Survival rates were significantly better with iloprost than without in both 30-day (p=0.009) and 5-year cumulative (p=0.0187) survival. Iloprost infusion for 72 hr after open AAA repair was associated with improved systemic perfusion and decreased systemic ischemia. Patients had a significant survival benefit at 30 days and 5 years and significantly improved renal, cardiac, and respiratory function.
    • Subacute anterior spinal cord ischemia with lower limb monoplegia: a clinical dilemma and challenging scenario.

      Waters, Peadar S; Tawfick, Wael; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Galway University Hospital, Western Vascular Institute, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. (2012-12)
      A 70-year-old woman presented with crescendo right lower limb monoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging depicted anterior spinal artery syndrome with an 8.5 cm Crawford type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). A staged hybrid procedure was performed, following which she had total exclusion of her TAAA and full resolution of her monoplegia. Clinical presentations of TAAAs can be diverse and require detailed clinical knowledge and lateral thinking to unearth unorthodox presentations. This erratic presentation of a TAAA with anterior spinal artery syndrome outlines particular challenges with management and portrays the need for tailored utilization of contemporary techniques to deal with the growing complexity of TAAAs.