• An online management information system for objective structured clinical examinations

      Kropmans,Thomas JB; O’Donovan, Barry GG; Cunningham, David; Murphy, Andrew W; Flaherty, Gerard; Nestel, Debra; Dunne, Fidelma P; Galway University Hospital (Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2012-01-01)
      Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) are adopted for high stakes assessment in medical education. Students pass through a series of timed stations demonstrating specific skills. Examiners observe and rate students using predetermined criteria. In most OSCEs low level technology is used to capture, analyse and produce results. We describe an OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) to streamline the OSCE process and improve quality assurance. OMIS captured OSCE data in real time using a Web 2.0 platform. We compared the traditional paper trail outcome with detailed real time analyses of separate stations. Using a paper trail version only one student failed the OSCE. However, OMIS identified nineteen possibly ‘incompetent’ students. Although there are limitations to the design of the study, the results are promising and likely to lead to defendable judgements on student performance.
    • Survey of Smartphone Use among Anaesthetists In Saolta University Health Care Group

      Kinirons, Alhomary, B. (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-03)
      Recent centuries have witnessed a revolution in technology which has made significant contributions to improve the quality of many aspects of our lives, including healthcare systems. Among these rapidly advancing technologies, smartphones stand out as an example of valuable devices that have dramatically changed the healthcare domain and the clinical practice. There is substantial evidence of the role of smartphones and medical applications in the daily practice of healthcare professionals. In one market research, it was estimated that 72% of US physicians use smartphones, and this number was expected to rise to 81% by 20121. This increasing popularity of smartphones can be attributed to the numerous benefits associated with their use. For instance, they can provide immediate access to a wealth of medical and health information via internet, emails and instant messages. Furthermore, they can lead to improved communications between healthcare professionals, and hence improved patient care2. An essential feature of smartphones is the integrated software applications (apps). These apps can either be preinstalled on the device or can be web apps that are accessed and downloaded via the internet. It is estimated that over 300,000 apps were developed between 2007 and 20103, and developers categorise a subset of these applications as medical apps. The utilisation of these medical apps by health care personnel, including anaesthetists has evolved recently.