• The analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block after cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

      McDonnell, John G; Curley, Gerard; Carney, John; Benton, Aoife; Costello, Joseph; Maharaj, Chrisen H; Laffey, John G; Department of Anaesthesia, Clinical Sciences Institute, Centre for Pain Research, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. (2008-01)
      The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is an effective method of providing postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing midline abdominal wall incisions. We evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after cesarean delivery performed through a Pfannensteil incision, in a randomized controlled, double-blind, clinical trial.
    • Clinical efficacy and cost per quality-adjusted life years of pararenal endovascular aortic aneurysm repair compared with open surgical repair.

      Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital Galway, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. sherif.sultan@hse.ie (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2011-04)
      To gauge the efficacy of applying commercially-available endografts to pararenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair compared with open surgical repair (OSR).
    • Comparison of Macintosh, Truview EVO2, Glidescope, and Airwayscope laryngoscope use in patients with cervical spine immobilization.

      Malik, M A; Maharaj, C H; Harte, B H; Laffey, J G; Department of Anaesthesia, Clinical Sciences Institute, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. (2008-11)
      The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and the Truview EVO2, in comparison with the Macintosh laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization.
    • A comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq or the Macintosh laryngoscope in routine airway management: A randomised, controlled clinical trial.

      Maharaj, C H; O'Croinin, D; Curley, G; Harte, B H; Laffey, J G; Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. (2006-11)
      The Airtraq laryngoscope is a novel single use tracheal intubation device. We compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope in patients deemed at low risk for difficult intubation in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Sixty consenting patients presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation were randomly allocated to undergo intubation using a Macintosh (n = 30) or Airtraq (n = 30) laryngoscope. All patients were intubated by one of four anaesthetists experienced in the use of both laryngoscopes. No significant differences in demographic or airway variables were observed between the groups. All but one patient, in the Macintosh group, was successfully intubated on the first attempt. There was no difference between groups in the duration of intubation attempts. In comparison to the Macintosh laryngoscope, the Airtraq resulted in modest improvements in the intubation difficulty score, and in ease of use. Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq resulted in less alterations in heart rate. These findings demonstrate the utility of the Airtraq laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in low risk patients.
    • The effects of normalizing hyperhomocysteinemia on clinical and operative outcomes in patients with critical limb ischemia.

      Waters, Peadar S; Fennessey, Paul J; Hynes, Niamh; Heneghan, Helen M; Tawfick, Wael; Sultan, Sherif; Western Vascular Institute, University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2012-12)
      To assess the outcome of patients with medically treated hyperhomocysteinemia (HHC) requiring intervention for critical limb ischemia (CLI).
    • Evaluation of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation.

      Maharaj, C H; Costello, J F; Harte, B H; Laffey, J G; Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. (2008-02)
      The Airtraq, a novel single use indirect laryngoscope, has demonstrated promise in the normal and simulated difficult airway. We compared the ease of intubation using the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Forty consenting patients presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation, who were deemed to possess at least three characteristics indicating an increased risk for difficulty in tracheal intubation, were randomly assigned to undergo tracheal intubation using a Macintosh (n = 20) or Airtraq (n = 20) laryngoscope. All patients were intubated by one of three anaesthetists experienced in the use of both laryngoscopes. Four patients were not successfully intubated with the Macintosh laryngoscope, but were intubated successfully with the Airtraq. The Airtraq reduced the duration of intubation attempts (mean (SD); 13.4 (6.3) vs 47.7 (8.5) s), the need for additional manoeuvres, and the intubation difficulty score (0.4 (0.8) vs 7.7 (3.0)). Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq also reduced the degree of haemodynamic stimulation and minor trauma compared to the Macintosh laryngoscope.
    • Isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis plus primary stenting in a single procedure to treat acute thrombotic superior vena cava syndrome.

      O'Sullivan, Gerard J; Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Ferguson, David; Delappe, Eithne; O'Riordan, Conor; Browne, Ann Michelle; Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, and, University College Hospital, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. gerard.osullivan2@hse.ie (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2010-02)
      To report a combined procedure that opens the acutely thrombosed superior vena cava (SVC) to rapidly alleviate symptoms in seriously ill patients with SVC syndrome.
    • Patients on hemodialysis are better served by a proximal arteriovenous fistula for long-term venous access.

      Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Hamada, Nader; Tawfick, Wael; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, Galway University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sherif.sultan@hse.ie (2012-11)
      Patients with end-stage renal disease should have arteriovenous fistula (AVF) formation 3 to 6 months prior to commencing hemodialysis (HD). However, this is not always possible with strained health care resources. We aim to compare autologous proximal AVF (PAVF) with distal AVF (DAVF) in patients already on HD. Primary end point is 4-year functional primary. Secondary end point is freedom from major adverse clinical events (MACEs). From January 2003 to June 2009, out of 495 AVF formations, 179 (36%) patients were already on HD. These patients had 200 AVF formations (49 DAVF vs 151 PAVF) in arms in which no previous fistula had been formed. No synthetic graft was used. Four-year primary functional patency significantly improved with PAVF (68.9% ± SD 8.8%) compared to DAVF (7.3% ± SD 4.9%; P < .0001). Five-year freedom from MACE was 85% with PAVF compared to 40% with DAVF (P < .005). Proximal AVF bestows long-term functional access with fewer complications compared to DAVF for patients already on HD.
    • A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

      Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute at the University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2007-12)
      To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.
    • Prospective evaluation of outcome measures in free-flap surgery.

      Kelly, John L; Eadie, Patricia A; Orr, David; Al-Rawi, Mogdad; O'Donnell, Margaret; Lawlor, Denis; Department of Plastic Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Newcastle, Ireland. (2004-08)
      Free-flap failure is usually caused by venous or arterial thrombosis. In many cases, lack of experience and surgical delay also contribute to flap loss. The authors prospectively analyzed the outcome of 57 free flaps over a 28-month period (January, 1999 to April, 2001). The setting was a university hospital tertiary referral center. Anastomotic technique, ischemia time, choice of anticoagulant, and the grade of surgeon were recorded. The type of flap, medications, and co-morbidities, including preoperative radiotherapy, were also documented. Ten flaps were re-explored (17 percent). There were four cases of complete flap failure (6.7 percent) and five cases of partial failure (8.5 percent). In patients who received perioperative systemic heparin or dextran, there was no evidence of flap failure (p = .08). The mean ischemia time was similar in flaps that failed (95 +/- 29 min) and in those that survived (92 +/- 34 min). Also, the number of anastomoses performed by trainees in flaps that failed (22 percent), was similar to the number in flaps that survived (28 percent). Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and there was complete flap survival in each case. This study reveals that closely supervised anastomoses performed by trainees may have a similar outcome to those performed by more senior surgeons. There was no adverse effect from radiotherapy or increased ischemia time on flap survival.
    • Recovery of older patients undergoing ambulatory anaesthesia with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

      Mahajan, V A; Ni Chonghaile, M; Bokhari, S A; Harte, B H; Flynn, N M; Laffey, J G; National University of Ireland, Clinical Sciences Institute, and National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Sciences (NCBES), Department of Anaesthesia, Galway, Ireland. (2007-06)
      Delayed recovery of cognitive function is a well-recognized phenomenon in older patients. The potential for the volatile anaesthetic used to contribute to alterations in postoperative cognitive function in older patients following minor surgical procedures has not been determined. We compared emergence from isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia in older surgical patients undergoing urological procedures of short duration.
    • Sequential compression biomechanical device in patients with critical limb ischemia and nonreconstructible peripheral vascular disease.

      Sultan, Sherif; Hamada, Nader; Soylu, Esraa; Fahy, Anne; Hynes, Niamh; Tawfick, Wael; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sherif.sultan@hse.ie (Journal of vascular surgery, 2011-08)
      Critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients who are unsuitable for intervention face the dire prospect of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. This study assessed the outcome of SCBD in severe CLI patients who otherwise would face an amputation. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Secondary end points were hemodynamic outcomes (increase in popliteal artery flow and toe pressure), ulcer healing, quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity of treatment (Q-TwiST), and cost-effectiveness.
    • Six years' experience with prostaglandin I2 infusion in elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a parallel group observational study in a tertiary referral vascular center.

      Beirne, Chris; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. (Annals of vascular surgery, 2008-11)
      The prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analogue iloprost, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation, has traditionally been utilized in pulmonary hypertension and off-label use for revascularization of chronic critical lower limb ischemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of 72 hr iloprost infusion on systemic ischemia post-open elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (EAAA) surgery. Between January 2000 and 2007, 104 patients undergoing open EAAA were identified: 36 had juxtarenal, 15 had suprarenal, and 53 had infrarenal aneurysms, with a mean maximal diameter of 6.9 cm. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1, with a mean age of 71.9 years. No statistically significant difference was seen between the study groups with regard to age, sex, risk factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, or diameter of aneurysm repaired. All emergency, urgent, and endovascular procedures for aneurysms were excluded. Fifty-seven patients received iloprost infusion for 72 hr in the immediate postoperative period compared with 47 patients who did not. Patients were monitored for signs of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, systemic ischemia, and postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Statistically significantly increased ventilation rates (p=0.0048), pulmonary complication rates (p=0.0019), and myocardial ischemia (p=0.0446) were noted in those patients not receiving iloprost. These patients also had significantly higher renal indices including estimate glomerular filtration rate changes (p=0.041) and postoperative urea level rises (p=0.0286). Peripheral limb trashing was noted in five patients (11.6%) in the non-iloprost group compared with no patients who received iloprost. Increased rates of transfusion requirements and bowel complications were noted in those who did not receive iloprost, with their ICU stay greater than twice that of iloprost patients. All-cause morbidity affected 67% of patients not receiving iloprost compared to 40% who did. Survival rates were significantly better with iloprost than without in both 30-day (p=0.009) and 5-year cumulative (p=0.0187) survival. Iloprost infusion for 72 hr after open AAA repair was associated with improved systemic perfusion and decreased systemic ischemia. Patients had a significant survival benefit at 30 days and 5 years and significantly improved renal, cardiac, and respiratory function.
    • Subacute anterior spinal cord ischemia with lower limb monoplegia: a clinical dilemma and challenging scenario.

      Waters, Peadar S; Tawfick, Wael; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Galway University Hospital, Western Vascular Institute, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. (2012-12)
      A 70-year-old woman presented with crescendo right lower limb monoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging depicted anterior spinal artery syndrome with an 8.5 cm Crawford type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). A staged hybrid procedure was performed, following which she had total exclusion of her TAAA and full resolution of her monoplegia. Clinical presentations of TAAAs can be diverse and require detailed clinical knowledge and lateral thinking to unearth unorthodox presentations. This erratic presentation of a TAAA with anterior spinal artery syndrome outlines particular challenges with management and portrays the need for tailored utilization of contemporary techniques to deal with the growing complexity of TAAAs.
    • Sustained weight loss and improvement of quality of life after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding for morbid obesity: a single surgeon experience in Ireland.

      Chang, K H; Condon, E T; O'Connor, E J; McAnena, O J; Department of Surgery, Galway University Hospital, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland. kahhoong_chang@yahoo.co.uk (2010-03)
      Although substantial weight loss is the primary outcome following bariatric surgery, changes in obesity-related morbidity and quality of life (QoL) are equally important. This study reports on weight loss, QoL and health outcomes following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB).
    • Ten-year technical and clinical outcomes in TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus II infrainguinal C/D lesions using duplex ultrasound arterial mapping as the sole imaging modality for critical lower limb ischemia.

      Sultan, Sherif; Tawfick, Wael; Hynes, Niamh; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Galway University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sherif.sultan@hse.ie (2013-04)
      The aim of this study was to evaluate duplex ultrasound arterial mapping (DUAM) as the sole imaging modality when planning for bypass surgery (BS) and endovascular revascularization (EvR) in patients with critical limb ischemia for TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C/D infrainguinal lesions.
    • Tracheal intubation by inexperienced medical residents using the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes--a manikin study.

      Maharaj, Chrisen H; Ni Chonghaile, Martina; Higgins, Brendan D; Harte, Brian H; Laffey, John G; Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. (2006-11)
      The Airtraq laryngoscope is a novel intubation device that may possess advantages over conventional direct laryngoscopes for use by personnel that are infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation. We conducted a prospective study in 20 medical residents with little prior airway management experience. After brief didactic instruction, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation using the Macintosh (Welch Allyn, Welch Allyn, NY) and Airtraq (Prodol Ltd. Vizcaya, Spain) devices, in 3 laryngoscopy scenarios in a Laerdal Intubation Trainer (Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway) and 1 scenario in a Laerdal SimMan manikin (Laerdal, Kent, UK). They then performed tracheal intubation of the normal airway a second time to characterize the learning curve. In all scenarios tested, the Airtraq decreased the duration of intubation attempts, reduced the number of optimization maneuvers required, and reduced the potential for dental trauma. The residents found the Airtraq easier to use in all scenarios compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope. The Airtraq may constitute a superior device for use by personnel infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation.