• Irritant contact dermatitis in healthcare workers as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study.

      Kiely, L F; Moloney, E; O'Sullivan, G; Eustace, J A; Gallagher, J; Bourke, J F (2020-09-05)
      COVID-19 healthcare workers (HCWs) require frequent handwashing and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to prevent infection. However, evidence is emerging that these practices are causing adverse effects on their skin integrity. A single-centre, cross-sectional study of HCWs from an Irish hospital was undertaken to evaluate the degree of COVID-19-related irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) between April and May 2020. Of 270 participants surveyed, 223 (82.6%) reported symptoms of ICD. The hands were the most commonly affected site (76.47%) and the most frequently reported symptom was dry skin (75.37%). Nearly all (268; 99.26%) HCWs had increased hand-washing frequency, but 122 (45.35%) did not use emollients. In the ICD group, 24.7% cited a history of dermatitis compared with 4.3% of unaffected staff (P < 0.001). The ICD group recorded PPE usage for an average of 3.15 h compared with the non-ICD group at 1.97 h (P = 0.21). Promoting awareness of COVID-19-related ICD is vital to highlight prevention and treatment for frontline staff.
    • 'I've always done what I was told by the medical people': a qualitative study of the reasons why older adults attend multifactorial falls risk assessments mapped to the Theoretical Domains Framework.

      Racine, Emmy; Soye, Anna; Barry, Patrick; Cronin, Finola; Hosford, Orla; Moriarty, Eileen; O'Connor, Kieran A; Turvey, Spencer; Timmons, Suzanne; Kearney, Patricia M; et al. (2020-02-18)
      Sixteen interviews were conducted. Three main themes explained participants' reasons for attending the multifactorial risk assessment; being that 'type of person', being 'linked in' with health and community services and having 'strong social support'. Six other themes were identified, but these themes were not as prominent during interviews. These were knowing what to expect, being physically able, having confidence in and being positive towards health services, imagining the benefits given previous positive experiences, determination to maintain or regain independence, and being 'crippled' by the fear of falling. These themes mapped on to nine TDF domains: 'knowledge', 'skills', 'social role and identity', 'optimism', 'beliefs about consequences', 'goals', 'environmental context and resources', 'social influences' and 'emotion'. There were five TDF domains that were not relevant to the reasons for attending.
    • Histologic Case Definition of an Atypical Glomerular Immune-Complex Deposition Following Kidney Transplantation.

      Chin, Kuo-Kai; Charu, Vivek; O'Shaughnessy, Michelle M; Troxell, Megan L; Cheng, Xingxing S (2020-02-05)
      Introduction: Immune-complex deposition in the transplanted kidney can present as well-phenotyped recurrent or de novo glomerular disease. However, a subset, herein termed immune-complex glomerulopathy not otherwise specified (ICG-NOS), defies classification. We quantified, categorized, and characterized cases of transplant ICG-NOS occurring at a single US academic medical center. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our single-institution pathology database (July 2007-July 2018) to identify and categorize all cases of immune-complex deposition in kidney allografts (based on immunofluorescence microscopy). We extracted clinicopathologic and outcome data for ICG-NOS (i.e., immune complex deposition not conforming to any well-characterized glomerular disease entity). Results: Of 104 patients with significant immune deposits, 28 (27%) were classified as ICG-NOS. We created 5 mutually exclusive ICG-NOS categories: Full-house, Quasi-full-house, IgA-rich, C1q-rich, and C1q-poor. Overall, 16 (57%) patients met criteria for definite or possible allograft rejection, including 9 (32%) with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), 3 (11%) suspicious for ABMR, 1 (4%) with T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), and 9 (32%) with borderline TCMR. After a median follow-up of 2.3 (range, 0.1-14.0) years after biopsy, 7 (25%) allografts had failed and an additional 8 (29%) had persistent renal dysfunction (hematuria, 14%; proteinuria, 21%; and estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 11%). Conclusion: In contrast to prior studies, our findings suggest that ICG-NOS is not necessarily a benign glomerular process and that there may be an association between ICG-NOS and alloimmunity. Our immunofluorescence-based classification provides a framework for future studies aiming to further elucidate ICG-NOS pathogenesis and prognosis.
    • Development of an Insulin-Prescribing Chart for Paediatric Diabetes

      Finn, B.P; O’Neill, T.; Bradfield, A.; O’Sullivan, T.; Beattie, S.; O’Connell, S.M. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-10)
      Our aim was to design a new insulin prescribing tool in compliance with the Irish Medicines Safety Network recommendations.
    • High-flow Nasal Cannulae, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and Retinopathy of Prematurity

      Healy, L.I; Corcoran, P.; Murphy, B.P (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-09)
      To determine if HFNC use was associated with changes in incidence of BPD and ROP.
    • Telephone Follow-Up of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury; A Feasibility Study

      Underwood, S.; Campbell, S.; Deasy, C. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-09)
      This study investigates the prevalence of Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) one-year post-injury in patients that were treated for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) in the Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) of Cork University Hospital’s (CUH) Emergency Department.
    • Listeria Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Child: Case Report and Literature Review

      McCarthy, K.N; Leahy, T.R; Murray, D.M (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-05)
      Listeria monocytogenes is a facultatively anaerobic Gram-positive bacillus that is an unusual cause of illness among immunocompetent individuals1. Infection with listeria is most commonly encountered in pregnancy, the neonatal period, and in immunocompromised patients2. Risk factors include food-borne exposures, particularly to soft cheeses and delicatessen meats, and life stock exposure3. Meningitis is the most frequently encountered clinical syndrome. L. monocytogenes accounts for 20% of cases of meningitis in neonates and in those >60 years and is the most common cause of meningitis among immunocompromised individuals1. Listeriosis is a rare disease in Ireland with a crude incidence rate of 0.41 per 100,000 which is lower than the EU average of 0.48 per 100,000 4.
    • High Rates of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Patients with New and Known Type 1 Diabetes over a Six-Year Period

      Finn, B.P.; Trayer, J.; Cronin, C.; O’Connell, S.M (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-03)
      Ireland is a high incidence country for type 1 diabetes (T1DM) with 28.8 newly diagnosed cases/100,000/year1. Patients with new onset T1DM frequently (15-70%) present with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)2,3,4,5. Lansdown et al found that 25% of children with new onset T1DM under 19 years of age presented in DKA in Wales between 1991 and 20096. The rates of DKA in known T1DM on an international stage remains significant- Austria and Germany (5%), Wales and England (6.4%) and the United States (7.1%)7. The aim of our study was to analyse all admissions with diabetic ketoacidosis to the regional paediatric diabetes centre at Cork University Hospital, over the past six years. Our objectives include assessing the proportion of patients with new and known T1DM, treatment modalities (e.g. pump/multiple daily injections), patient demographics, severity, length of stay and outcomes.
    • Moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise is safe and favorably influences body composition in patients with quiescent Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a randomized controlled cross-over trial.

      Cronin, Owen; Barton, Wiley; Moran, Carthage; Sheehan, Donal; Whiston, Ronan; Nugent, Helena; McCarthy, Yvonne; Molloy, Catherine B; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D; et al. (2019-02-12)
      Improved physical fitness was demonstrated in the exercise group by increases in median estimated VO2max (Baseline: 43.41mls/kg/min; post-intervention: 46.01mls/kg/min; p = 0.03). Improvement in body composition was achieved by the intervention group (n = 13) with a median decrease of 2.1% body fat compared with a non-exercising group (n = 7) (0.1% increase; p = 0.022). Lean tissue mass increased by a median of 1.59 kg and fat mass decreased by a median of 1.52 kg in the exercising group. No patients experienced a deterioration in disease activity scores during the exercise intervention. No clinically significant alterations in the α- and β-diversity of gut microbiota and associated metabolic pathways were evident.
    • Diagnostic Yield of Routine EEG in Adults with Active Epilepsy

      McGinty, R.N.; Costello, D.J.; Kinirons, P; McNamara, B (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-01)
      Routine electroencephalogram (rEEG) is an important investigation in suspected seizures but can be normal in people with epilepsy. The diagnostic yield of rEEG varies considerably according to the patient group studied. We aimed to estimate the diagnostic yield of rEEG in a real-world cohort of adults with active epilepsy—a population not previously reported. This single centre study evaluated neurophysiology findings for adults with prolonged inpatient video EEG (vEEG)-confirmed active epilepsy, who had at least one prior rEEG. Sixty-eight patients had a total of 171 rEEGs, of which 93 (54.4%) were normal, 42 (24.6%) found non-specific abnormalities and 36 (21.1%) captured interictal epileptiform abnormalities (IIEAs). Serial rEEGs revealed a 22.1% yield of IIEAs on the first test, with the cumulative yield peaking at 33.8% on the fourth rEEG. This study adds to existing evidence regarding the limited diagnostic usefulness of serial rEEG in patients with active epilepsy.
    • IgG4 Related Disease, A Case of Large Vessel Vasculitis

      O’Sullivan, A; Ghazi Al Qatari, S; Murphy, G; Cork University Hospital (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-10)
      This report describes a case of large vessel vasculitis highlighting diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. It describes the use of the B cell depleting agent Rituximab in this setting. This is the case of a 50 year old lady with bipolar disorder presenting with lower limb pain.
    • The Predictive Ability of Pre-Operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Pathological Outcomes in Prostate Cancer

      Nason, GJ; Selvarajah, L; O’Connor, EM; O’Kelly, J; Considine, SW; Moss, B; MacMahon, D; Heneghan, J; Meyer, N; Buckley, J; et al. (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-07)
      Accurate preoperative knowledge of tumour stage is important in preoperative planning at radical prostatectomy (RP). The aim of this study was to assess the predictive ability of multiparametric MRI for detecting pathological outcomes.
    • Gene-trait matching across the Bifidobacterium longum pan-genome reveals considerable diversity in carbohydrate catabolism among human infant strains.

      Arboleya, S; Bottacini, F; O'Connell-Motherway, M; Ryan, CA; Ross, RP; van Sinderen, D; Stanton, C; University College Cork (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-07)
      Bifidobacterium longum is a common member of the human gut microbiota and is frequently present at high numbers in the gut microbiota of humans throughout life, thus indicative of a close symbiotic host-microbe relationship. Different mechanisms may be responsible for the high competitiveness of this taxon in its human host to allow stable establishment in the complex and dynamic intestinal microbiota environment. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic and metabolic diversity in a set of 20 B. longum strains, most of which had previously been isolated from infants, by performing whole genome sequencing and comparative analysis, and to analyse their carbohydrate utilization abilities using a gene-trait matching approach.
    • The Utility of Dopamine Transporter Scans for Diagnosing Parkinsonian Disorders.

      Crotty, GF; O’Corragain, QA; Bogue, C; Crotty, J; O’Sullivan, S S (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-05)
      Dopamine transporter scans are increasingly being used in the diagnosis of clinically undefined Parkinsonism.
    • Presentations and Preceding factors of Drug Overdose amongst adolescents admitted to a Large Regional Hospital.

      Maduemem, KE; Adedokun, C; Umana, E (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-04)
      Suicide is the third most common cause of death among adolescents globally, and poisoning is the leading method of attempted suicide. Survival after self-poisoning or drug overdose (OD) is common, providing an opportunity for secondary prevention. The aim of this study was to highlight pattern of presentations and preceding factors of OD in an adolescent population. We retrospectively evaluated the data of 85 adolescents presenting to a large regional hospital with OD over a 3-year period. The female-to-male ratio was 4.3:1. The median age of adolescents was 15.83 (range: 11.32 – 16.98) years. History of deliberate self-harm (DSH) was documented in 44.7%. Twenty-eight (33%) patients had been under the care of the CAMHS prior to index admission. Acetaminophen was the commonest drug used. Depression was the most common cause of mental illness in the study group. Substance abuse and conduct disorder were significantly commoner in males (p<0.05). Self-poisoning including OD in adolescence is a strong predictor of suicide; understanding the probable triggers can be significant in establishing appropriate prevention strategies.
    • Parental And Clinician Views Of Consent In Neonatal Research

      O’Shea, N; Doran, K; Ryan, C A; Dempsey, E (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-03)
      Informed consent is an obligatory requirement for research participation1. The process of informed consent states that certain measures must be followed to ensure a research participant has made an informed decision about their participation in a research study2,3. Consent for research should be voluntary, informed, and understood by the consenting individual who must also be competent to do so. In the case of neonatal research informed consent is acquired from parent(s)/guardian(s) of a patient.
    • Clozapine Patients at the Interface between Primary and Secondary Care.

      Barrett, Marita; Keating, Anna; Lynch, Deirdre; Scanlon, Geraldine; Kigathi, Mary; Corcoran, Fidelma; Sahm, Laura J (Pharmacy, 2018-02-26)
      Patients receiving clozapine must undergo routine blood monitoring to screen for neutropenia, and to monitor for potential agranulocytosis. In Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland, clozapine is dispensed in the hospital pharmacy and the pharmacists are not aware of co-prescribed medicines, potentially impacting upon patient safety. The aim of this study was to examine the continuity of care of patients prescribed clozapine. A retrospective audit was conducted on patients attending the clozapine clinic at Cork University Hospital and assessed patients' (i) independent living, (ii) co-prescribed medicines and (iii) knowledge of their community pharmacists regarding co-prescribed clozapine. A list of prescribed medicines for each patient was obtained, and potential drug-drug interactions between these medicines and clozapine were examined using Lexicomp®and Stockley's Interaction checker. Secondary outcomes included patients' physical health characteristics, and a review of co-morbidities. Data were collected between the 29 May 2017 and 20 June 2017. Local ethics committee approval was granted. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were receiving clozapine treatment as part of a registered programme, were aged 18 years or more, and had the capacity to provide written informed consent. Microsoft Excel was used for data analysis. Of 112 patients, (33% female; mean age (SD) 43.9 (11.3) years; 87.5% living independently/in the family home) 86.6% patients reported that they were taking other prescribed medicines from community pharmacies. The mean (SD) number of co-prescribed medicines in addition to clozapine was 4.8 (4) per patient. Two thirds of community pharmacists were unaware of co-prescribed clozapine. Interactions with clozapine were present in all but 3 patients on co-prescribed medicines (n= 97). Lexicomp®reported 2.9 drug-drug interactions/patient and Stockley's Interaction Checker reported 2.5 drug-drug interactions/patient. Secondary outcomes for patients included BMI, total cholesterol, and HbA1clevels, which were elevated in 75%, 54% and 17% respectively. Patients prescribed clozapine did not receive a seamless service, between primary and secondary care settings. Community pharmacists were not informed of clozapine, prescribed for their patients, in two thirds of cases. Patients in this study were exposed to clozapine-related drug-drug interactions and hence potential adverse effects. This study supports reports in the literature of substandard management of the physical health of this patient group. This study shows that there is an opportunity for pharmacists to develop active roles in the management of all clozapine-related effects, in addition to their traditional obligatory role in haematological monitoring. This study supports the need for a clinical pharmacist to review inpatients commencing on clozapine, monitor for drug-drug interactions and provide counselling.
    • A Descriptive Study Of The Burden Of Animal-Related Trauma At Cork University Hospital.

      Sheehan, M; Deasy, C (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-01)
      Farming is the most dangerous occupation in Ireland1 and the incidence of farm accidents is rising. This study examines major farm animal-related trauma treated at Cork University Hospital over a 5 year period. There were 54 patients admitted to Cork University Hospital (C.U.H.) with major farm animal-related trauma. The median age was 56 years, 85% were male and the median hospital length of stay was four days. Older patients had longer lengths of stay; 5.5 vs 4 days (p=0.026). Tibia/fibula fractures were the most common injuries (N=13, 24%); head injury occurred in six patients (11%). There were 32 (59%) patients who required surgery, the majority for orthopaedic injuries. There were nine patients (16.7%) admitted to the intensive care unit; their median ICU stay was four days. Injury prevention and treatment strategies require that the age profile, mechanism of injury and injury patterns of farmers sustaining animal-related trauma is recognised.
    • A Study To Assess The Prevalence Of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction In Inter-County Hurling.

      Hunt, EB; Murphy, B; Murphy, C; Crowley, T; Cronin, O; Hay, S; Stack, M; Bowen, B; Ronan, N; Greene, E; et al. (Irish Medical Journal, 2017-11)
      Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) is an acute, transient airway narrowing occurring after exercise which may impact athletic performance. Studies report 10% of the general population and up to 90% of asthmatics experience EIB. Ninety-two players from three elite hurling squads underwent a spirometric field-based provocation test with real-time heart rate monitoring and lactate measurements to ensure adequate exertion. Players with a new diagnosis of EIB and those with a negative field-test but with a previous label of EIB or asthma underwent further reversibility testing and if negative, methacholine challenge. Eight (8.7%) of players had EIB, with one further athlete having asthma with a negative field test. Interestingly, only three out of 12 players who had previously been physician-labelled with EIB or asthma had their diagnosis objectively confirmed. Our study highlights the role of objective testing in EIB.
    • Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment: Aetiological Evaluation of Infants identified through the Irish Newborn Hearing Screening Programme

      Smith, A; Hennessy, S; O’Connor, A; O’ Sullivan, P. G.; Gibson, L (Irish Medical Journal, 2017-11)
      The Newborn Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP) was established in Cork University Maternity Hospital (CUMH) in April 2011. Between April 2011 and July 2014, 42 infants were identified with a Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment (PCHI). Following this diagnosis, infants underwent a paediatric assessment according to recognised guidelines with the intention of identifying the underlying aetiology of the PCHI. The aim of this study was to assess the findings of this aetiological workup via retrospective chart review. PCHI data was obtained from the eSP database. This is a web based information system (eSP) used to track each baby through the screening and referral process A retrospective chart review of these patients was performed. Sixteen (38%) infants were diagnosed with a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Two infants had congenital CMV infection. A Connexin 26 gene mutation was detected in one infant. Two infants were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome, One with Pendred syndrome and one with Pfeiffer syndrome. Five babies underwent cochlear implantation. Through adherence to the recommended protocol a possible cause of PCHI may be determined. This study has identified areas of future improvement for this service in Ireland.