• Ethnic variation between white European women in labour outcomes in a setting in which the management of labour is standardised-a healthy migrant effect?

      Walsh, J; Mahony, R; Armstrong, F; Ryan, G; O'Herlihy, C; Foley, M; UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, 2011-05)
      To test the hypothesis that women from Eastern European countries have lower caesarean delivery rates and higher spontaneous labour rates relative to Irish women in a setting in which the management of labour is standardised.
    • A randomised controlled trial using the Epidrum for labour epidurals.

      Deighan, M; Briain, D O; Shakeban, H; O'Flaherty, D; Abdulla, H; Al-Jourany, A; Ash, S; Ahmed, S; McMorrow, R (Irish Medical Journal, 2015-03)
      The aim of our study was to determine if using the Epidrum to site epidurals improves success and reduces morbidity. Three hundred parturients requesting epidural analgesia for labour were enrolled. 150 subjects had their epidural sited using Epidrum and 150 using standard technique. We recorded subject demographics, operator experience, number of attempts, Accidental Dural Puncture rate, rate of failure to site epidural catheter, rate of failure of analgesia, Post Dural Puncture Headache and Epidural Blood Patch rates. Failure rate in Epidrum group was 9/150 (6%) vs 0 (0%) in the Control group (P = 0.003). There were four (2.66%) accidental dural punctures in the Epidrum group and none in the Control group (P = 0.060), and 2 epidurals out of 150 (1.33%) in Epidrum group were re-sited, versus 3/150 (2%) in the control group (P = 1.000). The results of our study do not suggest that using Epidrum improves success or reduces morbidity.