• High flow nasal cannula for respiratory support in preterm infants.

      Wilkinson, Dominic; Andersen, Chad; O'Donnell, Colm Pf; De Paoli, Antonio G; Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women's and Children's Hospital, University of Adelaide, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide, SA, Australia, 5006. (The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 2011)
      High flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) are small, thin, tapered cannulae used to deliver oxygen or blended oxygen and air at flow rates of > 1 L/min. HFNC can be used to provide high concentrations of oxygen and may deliver positive end-expiratory pressure.
    • A randomised controlled trial using the Epidrum for labour epidurals.

      Deighan, M; Briain, D O; Shakeban, H; O'Flaherty, D; Abdulla, H; Al-Jourany, A; Ash, S; Ahmed, S; McMorrow, R (Irish Medical Journal, 2015-03)
      The aim of our study was to determine if using the Epidrum to site epidurals improves success and reduces morbidity. Three hundred parturients requesting epidural analgesia for labour were enrolled. 150 subjects had their epidural sited using Epidrum and 150 using standard technique. We recorded subject demographics, operator experience, number of attempts, Accidental Dural Puncture rate, rate of failure to site epidural catheter, rate of failure of analgesia, Post Dural Puncture Headache and Epidural Blood Patch rates. Failure rate in Epidrum group was 9/150 (6%) vs 0 (0%) in the Control group (P = 0.003). There were four (2.66%) accidental dural punctures in the Epidrum group and none in the Control group (P = 0.060), and 2 epidurals out of 150 (1.33%) in Epidrum group were re-sited, versus 3/150 (2%) in the control group (P = 1.000). The results of our study do not suggest that using Epidrum improves success or reduces morbidity.
    • A randomised crossover study of low-flow air or oxygen via nasal cannulae to prevent desaturation in preterm infants.

      Hensey, Conor C; Hayden, Eoghan; O'Donnell, Colm Patrick Finbarr; Department of Neonatology, The National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2013-09)
      To compare the efficacy of low-flow oxygen, low-flow air and sham treatment given via nasal cannulae in preventing desaturation (falls in oxygen saturation (SpO2)) in preterm infants.