• The association between maternal dietary micronutrient intake and neonatal anthropometry - secondary analysis from the ROLO study.

      Horan, Mary K; McGowan, Ciara A; Gibney, Eileen R; Donnelly, Jean M; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M (2015)
      Micronutrients are necessary for fetal growth. However increasingly pregnant women are nutritionally replete and little is known about the effect of maternal micronutrient intakes on fetal adiposity in mothers with increased BMI. The aim of this study was to examine the association of maternal dietary micronutrient intake with neonatal size and adiposity in a cohort at risk of macrosomia.
    • The association of maternal and fetal glucose homeostasis with fetal adiposity and birthweight.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona; Byrne, Jacinta; Foley, Michael; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, 2011-12)
      To examine the association between maternal and fetal glucose levels and fetal adiposity and infant birthweight.
    • Maternal Nutrition and Glycaemic Index during Pregnancy Impacts on Offspring Adiposity at 6 Months of Age--Analysis from the ROLO Randomised Controlled Trial.

      Horan, Mary K; McGowan, Ciara A; Gibney, Eileen R; Byrne, Jacinta; Donnelly, Jean M; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M (MDPI AG, 2016-01-04)
      Childhood obesity is associated with increased risk of adult obesity and metabolic disease. Diet and lifestyle in pregnancy influence fetal programming; however the influence of specific dietary components, including low glycaemic index (GI), remains complex. We examined the effect of a maternal low GI dietary intervention on offspring adiposity at 6 months and explored the association between diet and lifestyle factors in pregnancy and infant body composition at 6 months. 280 6-month old infant and mother pairs from the control (n = 142) and intervention group (n = 138), who received low GI dietary advice in pregnancy, in the ROLO study were analysed. Questionnaires (food diaries and lifestyle) were completed during pregnancy, followed by maternal lifestyle and infant feeding questionnaires at 6 months postpartum. Maternal anthropometry was measured throughout pregnancy and at 6 months post-delivery, along with infant anthropometry. No difference was found in 6 months infant adiposity between control and intervention groups. Maternal trimester three GI, trimester two saturated fats and trimester one and three sodium intake were positively associated with offspring adiposity, while trimester two and three vitamin C intake was negatively associated. In conclusion associations were observed between maternal dietary intake and GI during pregnancy and offspring adiposity at 6 months of age.
    • Pregnancy in dark winters: implications for fetal bone growth?

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Kilbane, Mark; McGowan, Ciara A; McKenna, Malachi J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (Elsevier, 2013-01)
      To prospectively examine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in pregnancy and to correlate maternal and fetal vitamin D to fetal anthropometry.
    • The relationship between maternal and fetal vitamin D, insulin resistance, and fetal growth.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; McGowan, Ciara A; Kilbane, Mark; McKenna, Malachi J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland (2013-05)
      Evidence for a role of vitamin D in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis is inconclusive. We sought to clarify the relationship between maternal and fetal insulin resistance and vitamin D status. This is a prospective cohort study of 60 caucasian pregnant women. Concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), glucose, insulin, and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. Ultrasound at 34 weeks assessed fetal anthropometry including abdominal wall width, a marker of fetal adiposity. At delivery birth weight was recorded and fetal 25-OHD, glucose, C-peptide, and leptin measured in cord blood. Insulin resistance was calculated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) equation. We found that those with lower 25-OHD in early pregnancy had higher HOMA indices at 28 weeks, (r = -.32, P = .02). No significant relationship existed between maternal or fetal leptin and 25-OHD, or between maternal or fetal 25-OHD and fetal anthropometry or birth weight. The incidence of vitamin D deficiency was high at each time point (15%-45%). These findings lend support to routine antenatal supplementation with vitamin D in at risk populations.