• The association of maternal and fetal glucose homeostasis with fetal adiposity and birthweight.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona; Byrne, Jacinta; Foley, Michael; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, 2011-12)
      To examine the association between maternal and fetal glucose levels and fetal adiposity and infant birthweight.
    • The benefit of early treatment without rescreening in women with a history of gestational diabetes.

      Maher, Nicola; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Michael; UCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street, Dublin 2, Ireland. mahernicola@hotmail.com (2013-02)
      In this center, women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) are treated without rescreening from early pregnancy in any subsequent pregnancies, commencing with a low glycemic diet and insulin if and when indicated. The objective of this study was to see if this practice reduced the incidence of macrosomia compared with the index pregnancy.
    • Ghrelin concentrations in maternal and cord blood of type 1 diabetic and non-diabetic pregnancies at term.

      Hehir, Mark P; Laursen, Henriette; Higgins, Mary F; Brennan, Donal J; O'Connor, Darran P; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland. markhehir23@gmail.com (Springer, 2013-02)
    • Identification of those most likely to benefit from a low-glycaemic index dietary intervention in pregnancy.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona M; Canty, Gillian; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital,Dublin,Republic of Ireland. (2014-08-28)
      The present study is a secondary analysis of the ROLO study, a randomised control trial of a low-glycaemic index (GI) diet in pregnancy to prevent the recurrence of fetal macrosomia. The objectives of the present study were to identify which women are most likely to respond to a low-GI dietary intervention in pregnancy with respect to three outcome measures: birth weight; maternal glucose intolerance; gestational weight gain (GWG). In early pregnancy, 372 women had their mid-upper arm circumference recorded and BMI calculated. Concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. At delivery, infant birth weight was recorded and fetal glucose, C-peptide and leptin concentrations were measured in the cord blood. Women who benefited in terms of infant birth weight were shorter, with a lower education level. Those who maintained weight gain within the GWG guidelines were less overweight in both their first and second pregnancies, with no difference being observed in maternal height. Women who at 28 weeks of gestation developed glucose intolerance, despite the low-GI diet, had a higher BMI and higher glucose concentrations in early pregnancy with more insulin resistance. They also had significantly higher-interval pregnancy weight gain. For each analysis, women who responded to the intervention had lower leptin concentrations in early pregnancy than those who did not. These findings suggest that the maternal metabolic environment in early pregnancy is important in determining later risks of excessive weight gain and metabolic disturbance, whereas birth weight is mediated more by genetic factors. It highlights key areas, which warrant further interrogation before future pregnancy intervention studies, in particular, maternal education level and inter-pregnancy weight gain.
    • Interpregnancy weight changes and impact on pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women with a macrosomic first delivery: a prospective longitudinal study.

      Crosby, David A; Walsh, Jennifer M; Segurado, Ricardo; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. UCD Perinatal Research Centre, School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. CSTAR, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017-06-06)
      To determine the median interpregnancy maternal weight change between first and second pregnancies, and second and third pregnancies and to assess the impact of this weight change on pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women with a macrosomic first delivery.
    • Low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy to prevent macrosomia (ROLO study): randomised control trial.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; McGowan, Ciara A; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-08)
      To determine if a low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy could reduce the incidence of macrosomia in an at risk group.
    • Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Kandamany, Nandini; Ni Shuibhne, Niamh; Power, Helen; Murphy, John F; O'Herlihy, Colm; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2011-04)
      We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.
    • Prediction and prevention of the macrosomic fetus.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2012-06)
      Fetal macrosomia is associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity. In the long term, infants who are large for gestational age are more likely than other infants to be obese in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, and are inherently at higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic complications in adulthood. With over one billion adults in the world now overweight and more than 600 million clinically obese, preventing the vicious cycle effect of fetal macrosomia and childhood obesity is an increasingly pertinent issue. Fetal growth is determined by a complex interplay of various genetic and environmental influences. Consequently the prediction of pregnancies at risk of pathological overgrowth is difficult. Many risk factors for fetal macrosomia, such as maternal obesity and advanced maternal age, are also conversely associated with intrauterine growth restriction. Sonographic detection of fetal macrosomia is notoriously fraught with difficulties, with dozens of formulas for estimated fetal weight proposed but few with sufficient sensitivity to alter clinical practice. This calls into question policies of elective delivery based on projected estimated fetal weight cut-offs alone. More recently the identification of markers of fetal adiposity and maternal serum biomarkers are being investigated to improve the antenatal detection of the large for gestational age fetus. Prevention of fetal macrosomia is entirely dependent upon correct identification of those at risk. Maternal weight, gestational weight gain and glycaemic control are the risk factors for fetal macrosomia that are most amenable to intervention, and have potential maternal health benefits beyond pregnancy and childbirth. The ideal method of optimising maternal weight and glucose homeostasis is yet to be elucidated, though a number of promising advances are recently being reported. In this review we outline the contemporary evidence for the prediction and prevention of fetal macrosomia, which is indeed a contemporary dilemma.
    • A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.

      Walsh, Jennifer; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2010)
      Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 12. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3.
    • The relationship between maternal and fetal vitamin D, insulin resistance, and fetal growth.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; McGowan, Ciara A; Kilbane, Mark; McKenna, Malachi J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland (2013-05)
      Evidence for a role of vitamin D in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis is inconclusive. We sought to clarify the relationship between maternal and fetal insulin resistance and vitamin D status. This is a prospective cohort study of 60 caucasian pregnant women. Concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), glucose, insulin, and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. Ultrasound at 34 weeks assessed fetal anthropometry including abdominal wall width, a marker of fetal adiposity. At delivery birth weight was recorded and fetal 25-OHD, glucose, C-peptide, and leptin measured in cord blood. Insulin resistance was calculated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) equation. We found that those with lower 25-OHD in early pregnancy had higher HOMA indices at 28 weeks, (r = -.32, P = .02). No significant relationship existed between maternal or fetal leptin and 25-OHD, or between maternal or fetal 25-OHD and fetal anthropometry or birth weight. The incidence of vitamin D deficiency was high at each time point (15%-45%). These findings lend support to routine antenatal supplementation with vitamin D in at risk populations.