• Maternal dietary patterns and associated nutrient intakes during each trimester of pregnancy.

      McGowan, Ciara A; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland. cmcgowa@gmail.com (2013-01)
      To determine the main dietary patterns of pregnant women during each of the three trimesters of pregnancy and to examine associated nutrient intakes.
    • Maternal nutrient intakes and levels of energy underreporting during early pregnancy.

      McGowan, C A; McAuliffe, F M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. cmcgowa@gmail.com (2012-08)
      Pregnancy is a critical period in a woman's life where nutrition is of key importance for optimal pregnancy outcome. The aim of this study was to assess maternal nutrient intakes during early pregnancy and to examine potential levels of energy underreporting.
    • A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.

      Walsh, Jennifer; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2010)
      Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 12. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3.