• Antenatal suspicion of ischemic placental disease and coexistence of maternal and fetal placental disease: analysis of over 500 cases.

      Cooley, Sharon M; Reidy, Fiona R; Mooney, Eoghan E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Fetal Medicine Center, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2011-12)
      To investigate the antenatal suspicion of placental disease and the coexistence of maternal and fetal placental ischemic disease.
    • The association of maternal and fetal glucose homeostasis with fetal adiposity and birthweight.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona; Byrne, Jacinta; Foley, Michael; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, 2011-12)
      To examine the association between maternal and fetal glucose levels and fetal adiposity and infant birthweight.
    • The benefit of early treatment without rescreening in women with a history of gestational diabetes.

      Maher, Nicola; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Michael; UCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street, Dublin 2, Ireland. mahernicola@hotmail.com (2013-02)
      In this center, women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) are treated without rescreening from early pregnancy in any subsequent pregnancies, commencing with a low glycemic diet and insulin if and when indicated. The objective of this study was to see if this practice reduced the incidence of macrosomia compared with the index pregnancy.
    • Clinical and ultrasound features of placental maturation in pre-gestational diabetic pregnancy.

      Higgins, Mary F; Russell, Noirin M; Mooney, Eoghan E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Ireland. (2012-10)
      Pre-gestational diabetes (PGDM) is a significant cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Delayed villous maturation (DVM) is a placental diagnosis with increased risk of perinatal mortality.
    • Increasing rates of operative vaginal delivery across two decades: accompanying outcomes and instrument preferences.

      Hehir, Mark P; Reidy, Fiona R; Wilkinson, Michael N; Mahony, Rhona; National Maternity Hospital, Holles St, Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: markhehir23@gmail.com. (2013-11)
      To examine rates and outcomes of operative vaginal delivery over a 20-year study period and the changing preference for various instruments during this period.
    • Low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy to prevent macrosomia (ROLO study): randomised control trial.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; McGowan, Ciara A; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-08)
      To determine if a low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy could reduce the incidence of macrosomia in an at risk group.
    • Mode of delivery at term and adverse neonatal outcomes.

      Walsh, Colin A; Robson, Michael; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; National Maternity Hospital and UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. colwalsh@hotmail.com (2013-01)
      To determine the relationship between mode of delivery and serious adverse neonatal outcomes in term, singleton, cephalic neonates.
    • Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Kandamany, Nandini; Ni Shuibhne, Niamh; Power, Helen; Murphy, John F; O'Herlihy, Colm; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2011-04)
      We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.
    • Real increasing incidence of hysterectomy for placenta accreta following previous caesarean section.

      Higgins, Mary F; Monteith, Cathy; Foley, Michael; O'Herlihy, Colm; Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Ireland. Electronic address: maryhiggins@physicians.ie. (2013-11)
      Placenta accreta, morbid adherence to the uterus to the myometrium, is commonest in association with placenta previa in women previously delivered by caesarean section (CS). It has become proportionally a greater cause of major maternal morbidity and mortality as the frequency of other serious obstetric complications has declined. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of placenta accreta in the context of a rising caesarean delivery rate.
    • Thoraco-amniotic shunting for fetal pleural effusion--a case series.

      Walsh, J; Mahony, R; Higgins, S; McParland, P; Carroll, S; McAuliffe, F; National Maternity Hospital, Holles St, Dublin 2. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2011-11-15)
      Fetal pleural effusion is a rare occurrence, with an incidence of 1 per 10-15,000 pregnancies. The prognosis is related to the underlying cause and is often poor. There is increasing evidence that in utero therapy with thoraco-amniotic shunting improves prognosis by allowing lung expansion thereby preventing hydrops and pulmonary hypoplasia. This is a review of all cases of fetal pleural effusion managed over an eight year period the National Maternity Hospital Dublin. Over the nine year period there were 21 cases of fetal pleural effusion giving an overall incidence of 1 per 9281 deliveries. Of these, 15 underwent thoraco-amniotic shunting. There were associated anomalies diagnosed in 5 (33%) of cases. The overall survival in our cohort was 53%. The presence of hydrops was a poor prognostic factor, with survival in cases with hydrops of 33% (3/9) compared to 83% (5/6) in those cases without associated hydrops.