• Ethnic variation between white European women in labour outcomes in a setting in which the management of labour is standardised-a healthy migrant effect?

      Walsh, J; Mahony, R; Armstrong, F; Ryan, G; O'Herlihy, C; Foley, M; UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, 2011-05)
      To test the hypothesis that women from Eastern European countries have lower caesarean delivery rates and higher spontaneous labour rates relative to Irish women in a setting in which the management of labour is standardised.
    • A method to assess obstetric outcomes using the 10-Group Classification System: a quantitative descriptive study.

      Rossen, Janne; Lucovnik, Miha; Eggebø, Torbjørn Moe; Tul, Natasa; Murphy, Martina; Vistad, Ingvild; Robson, Michael (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017)
      Internationally, the 10-Group Classification System (TGCS) has been used to report caesarean section rates, but analysis of other outcomes is also recommended. We now aim to present the TGCS as a method to assess outcomes of labour and delivery using routine collection of perinatal information.
    • Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Kandamany, Nandini; Ni Shuibhne, Niamh; Power, Helen; Murphy, John F; O'Herlihy, Colm; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2011-04)
      We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.
    • Quality assurance: The 10-Group Classification System (Robson classification), induction of labor, and cesarean delivery.

      Robson, Michael; Murphy, Martina; Byrne, Fionnuala (Elsevier, 2015-10)
      Quality assurance in labor and delivery is needed. The method must be simple and consistent, and be of universal value. It needs to be clinically relevant, robust, and prospective, and must incorporate epidemiological variables. The 10-Group Classification System (TGCS) is a simple method providing a common starting point for further detailed analysis within which all perinatal events and outcomes can be measured and compared. The system is demonstrated in the present paper using data for 2013 from the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Interpretation of the classification can be easily taught. The standard table can provide much insight into the philosophy of care in the population of women studied and also provide information on data quality. With standardization of audit of events and outcomes, any differences in either sizes of groups, events or outcomes can be explained only by poor data collection, significant epidemiological variables, or differences in practice. In April 2015, WHO proposed that the TGCS (also known as the Robson classification) is used as a global standard for assessing, monitoring, and comparing cesarean delivery rates within and between healthcare facilities.
    • A randomised controlled trial using the Epidrum for labour epidurals.

      Deighan, M; Briain, D O; Shakeban, H; O'Flaherty, D; Abdulla, H; Al-Jourany, A; Ash, S; Ahmed, S; McMorrow, R (Irish Medical Journal, 2015-03)
      The aim of our study was to determine if using the Epidrum to site epidurals improves success and reduces morbidity. Three hundred parturients requesting epidural analgesia for labour were enrolled. 150 subjects had their epidural sited using Epidrum and 150 using standard technique. We recorded subject demographics, operator experience, number of attempts, Accidental Dural Puncture rate, rate of failure to site epidural catheter, rate of failure of analgesia, Post Dural Puncture Headache and Epidural Blood Patch rates. Failure rate in Epidrum group was 9/150 (6%) vs 0 (0%) in the Control group (P = 0.003). There were four (2.66%) accidental dural punctures in the Epidrum group and none in the Control group (P = 0.060), and 2 epidurals out of 150 (1.33%) in Epidrum group were re-sited, versus 3/150 (2%) in the control group (P = 1.000). The results of our study do not suggest that using Epidrum improves success or reduces morbidity.