• Interpregnancy weight changes and impact on pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women with a macrosomic first delivery: a prospective longitudinal study.

      Crosby, David A; Walsh, Jennifer M; Segurado, Ricardo; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. UCD Perinatal Research Centre, School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. CSTAR, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017-06-06)
      To determine the median interpregnancy maternal weight change between first and second pregnancies, and second and third pregnancies and to assess the impact of this weight change on pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women with a macrosomic first delivery.
    • Maternal dietary patterns and associated nutrient intakes during each trimester of pregnancy.

      McGowan, Ciara A; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland. cmcgowa@gmail.com (2013-01)
      To determine the main dietary patterns of pregnant women during each of the three trimesters of pregnancy and to examine associated nutrient intakes.
    • The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.

      Dowling, Daniel; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2013)
      The incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat / high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.
    • Pregnant immigrant Nigerian women: an exploration of dietary intakes.

      Lindsay, K L; Gibney, E R; McNulty, B A; McAuliffe, F M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Holles St., Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: karenlindsay88@gmail.com. (2014-07)
      The aim of the study is to explore the dietary intakes of a prominent ethnic minority group of women from Sub-Saharan Africa during pregnancy, in order to identify nutritional issues of concern which may impact on pregnancy outcomes and whether different food based dietary guidelines may be required to meet their needs.
    • A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.

      Walsh, Jennifer; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2010)
      Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 12. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3.