• Anaesthesia for parturients with severe cystic fibrosis: a case series.

      Deighan, M; Ash, S; McMorrow, R; Department of Anaesthetics, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: maireadeighan@doctors.org.uk. (2014-02)
      Cystic fibrosis affects 1 in 1600-2500 live births and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It primarily involves the respiratory, gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts, with impaired clearance of, and obstruction by, increasingly viscous secretions. Severe respiratory disease, diabetes and gastro-oesophageal reflux may result. Improvements in medical management and survival of cystic fibrosis patients means more are committing to pregnancies. Although guidance for anaesthesia in this patient group is available, management and outcome data associated with more severe cases are sparse. Patients with severe cystic fibrosis require multidisciplinary input and should be managed in a tertiary referral centre. Close monitoring of respiratory function and preoperative optimisation during pregnancy are mandatory. The risk of preterm labour and delivery is increased. Pregnancy and delivery can be managed successfully, even in patients with FEV1 <40% predicted. Neuraxial anaesthesia and analgesia should be the technique of choice for delivery. Postoperative care should be carried out in a critical care setting with the provision of postoperative ventilation if necessary.
    • Antenatal suspicion of ischemic placental disease and coexistence of maternal and fetal placental disease: analysis of over 500 cases.

      Cooley, Sharon M; Reidy, Fiona R; Mooney, Eoghan E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Fetal Medicine Center, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2011-12)
      To investigate the antenatal suspicion of placental disease and the coexistence of maternal and fetal placental ischemic disease.
    • The association of maternal and fetal glucose homeostasis with fetal adiposity and birthweight.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona; Byrne, Jacinta; Foley, Michael; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, 2011-12)
      To examine the association between maternal and fetal glucose levels and fetal adiposity and infant birthweight.
    • Diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma associated with atypical glandular cells on liquid-based cervical cytology.

      Chummun, K; Fitzpatrick, M; Lenehan, P; Boylan, P; Mooney, E; Flannelly, G; National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-12)
      In 2008, the management of women in Ireland with atypical glandular cells changed to immediate referral to colposcopy. The optimal management of these women is unclear. A balance between the detection of occult disease and overtreatment is required.
    • Fetal and maternal leptin in pre-gestational diabetic pregnancy.

      Higgins, Mary F; Russell, Noirin M; Brazil, Derek P; Firth, Richard G; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2013-02)
      To compare maternal and fetal leptin among women without diabetes, women with type 1 diabetes, and women with type 2 diabetes.
    • Insufficient vitamin D intakes among pregnant women.

      McGowan, C A; Byrne, J; Walsh, J; McAuliffe, F M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. cmcgowa@gmail.com (2011-09)
      Vitamin D has an important role in pregnancy in promoting fetal skeletal health. Maternal dietary intake is a key factor influencing both maternal and fetal status. There are limited data available on food groups contributing to vitamin D intake in pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine dietary intakes of vitamin D throughout pregnancy in 64 women and to determine the main food groups contributing to vitamin D intake. Results showed that median dietary intakes of vitamin D ranged from 1.9-2.1 μg/d during pregnancy, and were 80% below the current recommendation. The principal food groups contributing to vitamin D intake were meat, egg and breakfast cereal groups. Oily fish, the best dietary source of vitamin D, was consumed by <25% of women. These data call for more education; they question the role of vitamin D supplementation and highlight the contribution of other food groups more frequently consumed, namely, breakfast cereals, meat and eggs.
    • Interpregnancy weight changes and impact on pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women with a macrosomic first delivery: a prospective longitudinal study.

      Crosby, David A; Walsh, Jennifer M; Segurado, Ricardo; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. UCD Perinatal Research Centre, School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. CSTAR, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017-06-06)
      To determine the median interpregnancy maternal weight change between first and second pregnancies, and second and third pregnancies and to assess the impact of this weight change on pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women with a macrosomic first delivery.
    • Maternal and fetal placental growth hormone and IGF axis in type 1 diabetic pregnancy.

      Higgins, Mary F; Russell, Noirin E; Crossey, Paul A; Nyhan, Kristine C; Brazil, Derek P; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012)
      Placental growth hormone (PGH) is a major growth hormone in pregnancy and acts with Insulin Like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) and Insulin Like Growth Hormone Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP3). The aim of this study was to investigate PGH, IGF-I and IGFBP3 in non-diabetic (ND) compared to Type 1 Diabetic (T1DM) pregnancies.
    • Maternal dietary patterns and associated nutrient intakes during each trimester of pregnancy.

      McGowan, Ciara A; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland. cmcgowa@gmail.com (2013-01)
      To determine the main dietary patterns of pregnant women during each of the three trimesters of pregnancy and to examine associated nutrient intakes.
    • Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; Kandamany, Nandini; Ni Shuibhne, Niamh; Power, Helen; Murphy, John F; O'Herlihy, Colm; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2011-04)
      We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.
    • Postpartum femoral neuropathy following spontaneous vaginal delivery.

      Peirce, C; O'Brien, C; O'Herlihy, C; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin and the National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2010-02)
    • Prevalence of physical activity among healthy pregnant women in Ireland.

      Walsh, Jennifer M; McGowan, Ciara; Byrne, Jacinta; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie (2011-08)