• Basic surgical training in Ireland: the impact of operative experience, training program allocation and mentorship on trainee satisfaction.

      O'Sullivan, K E; Byrne, J S; Walsh, T N; RCSI Department of Surgery, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15, Ireland, kaosulli@tcd.ie. (2013-12)
      Application to the Irish basic surgical training (BST) program in Ireland has decreased progressively over the past 5 years. We hypothesised that this decline was secondary to dissatisfaction with training correlated with reduced operative experience and lack of mentorship among BSTs.
    • Chemoradiotherapy, with adjuvant surgery for local control, confers a durable survival advantage in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus.

      Bass, G A; Furlong, H; O'Sullivan, K E; Hennessy, T P J; Walsh, T N; Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Department of Surgery, Connolly Hospital, Dublin 15, Ireland. Electronic address: garybassmd@gmail.com. (2014-04)
      Oesophageal cancer usually presents with systemic disease, necessitating systemic therapy. Neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves short-term survival, but its long-term impact is disputed because of limited accrual, treatment-protocol heterogeneity and a short follow-up of randomised trials.
    • Collagenous colitis as a possible cause of toxic megacolon.

      Fitzgerald, S C; Conlon, S; Leen, E; Walsh, T N; Department of Surgery, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin, Ireland. ktsfitz@hotmail.com (2009-03)
      Collagenous colitis is a microscopic colitis characterized by normal appearing colonic mucosa on endoscopy. It is regarded as a clinically benign disease which rarely results in serious complications. We report a case of toxic megacolon occurring in a patient with collagenous colitis. This is the first reported case of toxic megacolon occurring in this subset of patients.
    • Excision and primary closure of pilonidal sinus disease: worthwhile option with an acceptable recurrence rate.

      Gilani, S N S; Furlong, H; Reichardt, K; Nasr, A O; Theophilou, G; Walsh, T N; Academic Centre RCSI, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15, Ireland., drnadiagilani7@hotmail.com (2012-01-31)
      BACKGROUND: Treatment of pilonidal sinus disease is controversial. Many claim policy of marsupialisation and healing by secondary intention. This is demanding in terms of nursing care and time lost from work. AIMS: To examine outcome of excision and primary closure of chronic pilonidal disease on recurrence rate and patient's daily activities. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and fourteen consecutive elective patients who had excision and primary closure of pilonidal sinus disease were reviewed. The demographic data and the post-operative outcome were studied. RESULTS: The recurrence of pilonidal sinus was noted in 9% of patients, wound breakdown occasioning delayed healing in 9%, patients able to drive by day 16 on average. The mean time to return to work was 20.5 days; duration of analgesia, 2.4 days; and duration of antibiotic treatment, 4.7 days. CONCLUSION: Excision and primary closure of chronic pilonidal sinus has low recurrence rate with early return to activities. Primary closure appears to be a cost-effective option for uncomplicated pilonidal sinus disease.
    • Penetrating stab injuries at a single urban unit: are we missing the point?

      Kharytaniuk, N; Bass, G A; Salih, A; Twyford, M; O'Conor, E; Collins, N; Arumugasamy, M; Walsh, T N; Department of Surgery, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15, Ireland, n.nollaigin@gmail.com. (2014-05-28)
      Penetrating trauma-the classical presentation of disorganised crime-can pose a challenge in their management due to their complexity and unpredictability.