Now showing items 21-40 of 82

    • Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy

      Cagney, DN; Armstrong, JG (Irish Medical Journal, 2017-01)
      Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy
    • Small-cell carcinoma of the cervix at 23 weeks gestation.

      Smyth, Elizabeth C; Korpanty, Grzegorz; McCaffrey, John A; Mulligan, Niall; Carney, Desmond N (2010-06-20)
    • Attitudes and experiences towards setting up a bibliotherapy service for the bereavement support service (EAHIL Conference)

      Callinan, Joanne. (2011)
      Oral presentation at Best Posters Session at EAHIL Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, 2011.
    • A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

      Mullaney, L.; O'Shea, E.; Dunne, M.; Finn, M.; Thirion, P.; Cleary, L. A.; McGarry, M.; O'Neill, L.; Armstrong, J.G. (2014-01-10)
      Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.
    • Magnetic resonance imaging appearances in primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast.

      O'Neill, Ailbhe C; D'Arcy, Clare; McDermott, Enda; O'Doherty, Ann; Quinn, Cecily; McNally, Sorcha; Department of Breast Radiology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2014-04)
      Angiosarcomas are malignant tumours of endovascular origin. They are rare tumours accounting for 0.04-1% of all breast malignancies. Two different forms are described: primary, occurring in young women, and secondary angiosarcoma, which occurs in older women with a history of breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Imaging findings on mammography and ultrasound are non-specific, but magnetic resonance imaging with dynamic contrast enhancement is more informative. We present two cases - one of primary and one of secondary angiosarcoma - and review the imaging findings.
    • Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

      Martin, Lynn M; Marples, Brian; Lynch, Thomas H; Hollywood, Donal; Marignol, Laure (2014-07-10)
      This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications/relevance of the effect.
    • Cell death pathways in directly irradiated cells and cells exposed to medium from irradiated cells.

      Jella, Kishore Kumar; Garcia, Amaya; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M; Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin. (2013-03)
      The aim of this study was to compare levels of apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death and senescence after treatment with both direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium.
    • Active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer: diversity of practice across Europe.

      Azmi, A; Dillon, R A; Borghesi, S; Dunne, M; Power, R E; Marignol, L; O'Neill, B D P; St. Luke's Radiation Oncology Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, aini.azmi@slh.ie. (2014-03-21)
      Active surveillance (AS) is a recognised treatment option for low-risk prostate cancer (PCa).
    • Head and neck cancer of unknown primary site

      McArdle, Orla; McDermott, Ronan (2013-11-21)
    • Impact of delineation uncertainties on dose to organs at risk in CT-guided intracavitary brachytherapy.

      Duane, Frances K; Langan, Brian; Gillham, Charles; Walsh, Lorraine; Rangaswamy, Guhan; Lyons, Ciara; Dunne, Mary; Walker, Christopher; McArdle, Orla; Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Radiation Oncology Network, Rathgar, Dublin, Republic of Ireland. Electronic address: fran.duane@ctsu.ox.ac.uk. (2014-08-07)
      This study quantifies the inter- and intraobserver variations in contouring the organs at risk (OARs) in CT-guided brachytherapy (BT) for the treatment of cervical carcinoma. The dosimetric consequences are reported in accordance with the current Gynecological Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology guidelines.
    • Molecular and therapeutic advances in the diagnosis and management of malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

      Lowery, Aoife J; Walsh, Siun; McDermott, Enda W; Prichard, Ruth S; Department of Surgery, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2013)
      Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare catecholamine-secreting tumors derived from chromaffin cells originating in the neural crest. These tumors represent a significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenge because the diagnosis of malignancy is frequently made in retrospect by the development of metastatic or recurrent disease. Complete surgical resection offers the only potential for cure; however, recurrence can occur even after apparently successful resection of the primary tumor. The prognosis for malignant disease is poor because traditional treatment modalities have been limited. The last decade has witnessed exciting discoveries in the study of PCCs and PGLs; advances in molecular genetics have uncovered hereditary and germline mutations of at least 10 genes that contribute to the development of these tumors, and increasing knowledge of genotype-phenotype interactions has facilitated more accurate determination of malignant potential. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for malignant transformation in these tumors has opened avenues of investigation into targeted therapeutics that show promising results. There have also been significant advances in functional and radiological imaging and in the surgical approach to adrenalectomy, which remains the mainstay of treatment for PCC. In this review, we discuss the currently available diagnostic and therapeutic options for patients with malignant PCCs and PGLs and detail the molecular rationale and clinical evidence for novel and emerging diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.
    • Sensitivity of volumetric modulated arc therapy patient specific QA results to multileaf collimator errors and correlation to dose volume histogram based metrics.

      Coleman, Linda; Skourou, Christina; University Hospital Galway, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. (2013-11)
      This study investigates the impact of systematic multileaf collimator (MLC) positional errors on gamma analysis results used for quality assurance (QA) of Rapidarc treatments. In addition, this study evaluates the relationship of these gamma analysis results and clinical dose volume histogram metrics (DVH) for Rapidarc treatment plans.
    • Intravesical baclofen, bupivacaine, and oxycodone for the relief of bladder spasm.

      Wallace, Elaine; Twomey, Marie; Victory, Ray; O'Reilly, Maeve; Department of Palliative Medicine, St. Luke's Hospital, Rathgar, Dublin 6, Ireland. drelainewallace@gmail.com (2013)
    • Gene expression analysis in prostate cancer: the importance of the endogenous control.

      Vajda, Alice; Marignol, Laure; Barrett, Ciara; Madden, Stephen F; Lynch, Thomas H; Hollywood, Donal; Perry, Antoinette S; Prostate Molecular Oncology, Academic Unit of Clinical and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. vajdaa@tcd.ie (2013-03)
      Aberrant gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is the gold-standard for quantifying gene expression, and commonly employs a house-keeping gene (HKG) as an endogenous control to normalize results; the choice of which is critical for accurate data interpretation. Many factors, including sample type, pathological state, and oxygen levels influence gene expression including putative HKGs. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of commonly used HKGs for qRT-PCR in prostate cancer.
    • The use of complementary and alternative medicine by Irish pediatric cancer patients.

      O'Connor, Niamh; Graham, Donna; O'Meara, Anne; Devins, Mary; Jennings, Valerie; O'Leary, Denise; O'Reilly, Maeve; The Departments of Palliative Medicine and Oncology, Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland. (2013-10)
      The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the Irish pediatric cancer setting has not previously been established.
    • Endobronchial cryotherapy facilitates end-stage treatment options in patients with bronchial stenosis: A case series.

      Fitzmaurice, Gerard J; Redmond, Karen C; Fitzpatrick, David A; Bartosik, Waldemar; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin 7, Ireland. (2014-04)
      In keeping with international trends, lung cancer incidence and mortality are increasing among the Irish population with many patients presenting with advanced disease that excludes the potential for curative management. Consequently palliative treatment options for this patient group are being increasingly explored with various degrees of success. Endobronchial stenosis represents a particularly challenging area of management among these patients and a number of techniques have been described without the identification of a single gold standard. We report our experience of the first time use of endobronchial cryotherapy in Ireland with reference to a case series, including an example of its use in the management of benign disease, in order to support patients with borderline lung function and enable definitive palliative treatment.
    • Development of a label-free LC-MS/MS strategy to approach the identification of candidate protein biomarkers of disease recurrence in prostate cancer patients in a clinical trial of combined hormone and radiation therapy.

      Morrissey, Brian; O'Shea, Carmel; Armstrong, John; Rooney, Cathy; Staunton, Lisa; Sheehan, Martina; Shannon, Aoife M; Pennington, Stephen R; Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland. (2013-06)
      Combined hormone and radiation therapy (CHRT) is one of the principle curative regimes for localised prostate cancer (PCa). Following treatment, many patients subsequently experience disease recurrence however; current diagnostics tests fail to predict the onset of disease recurrence. Biomarkers that address this issue would be of significant advantage.
    • ADAM-17: a novel therapeutic target for triple negative breast cancer.

      McGowan, P M; Mullooly, M; Caiazza, F; Sukor, S; Madden, S F; Maguire, A A; Pierce, A; McDermott, E W; Crown, J; O'Donovan, N; et al. (2013-02)
      Validated targeted therapy is currently unavailable for patients with invasive breast cancer negative for oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors and HER2 [i.e., those with triple-negative (TN) disease]. ADAM-17 is a protease involved in the activations of several ligands that bind to and promotes intracellular signalling from the EGFR/HER family of receptors.
    • Prostate cancer in a male with Holt-Oram syndrome: first clinical association of the TBX5 mutation.

      Aherne, Noel J; Rangaswamy, Guhan; Thirion, Pierre; Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW 2450, Australia. (Hindawi Publishing Corp., 2013-08-05)
      Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.