• Aspirin In The Prevention Of Pre-Eclampsia: Where Are We Now?

      Khalid A,; Byrne, B M (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-03)
      Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy specific multi-systemic disorder that causes maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is estimated to complicate between three to five percent of pregnancies and contributes to 8 to 10% of all preterm births1,2. Aspirin inhibits cyclooxygenase in platelets and endothelium in a fashion that alters the balance between the vasoconstrictor thromboxane and the vasodilator prostacyclin. This potentiates vasodilatation and reduces platelet aggregation, contributors to the endothelial dysfunction seen in preeclampsia. Over 100 clinical trials have examined whether or not Aspirin, when prescribed from early pregnancy, can prevent pre-eclampsia, and the consensus is that it reduces the incidence by approximately 10 to 24 % in women that are deemed to be at risk3,4.
    • The efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate compared with cryoprecipitate in major obstetric haemorrhage - an observational study.

      Ahmed, S; Harrity, C; Johnson, S; Varadkar, S; McMorrow, S; Fanning, R; Flynn, C M; O' Riordan, J M; Byrne, B M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-10)
      Fibrinogen replacement is critical in major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). Purified, pasteurised fibrinogen concentrate appears to have benefit over cryoprecipitate in ease of administration and safety but is unlicensed in pregnancy. In July 2009, the Irish Blood Transfusion Service replaced cryoprecipitate with fibrinogen.
    • Prevention of thrombosis in pregnancy: how practical are consensus derived clinical practice guidelines?

      Hayes-Ryan, D; Byrne, B M; RCSI Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital (CWIUH), Dublin, Ireland. (2012-11)
      Thromboembolic disease (TED) has, for many years, consistently been identified as one of the leading causes of direct maternal mortality. In November 2009, the RCOG published a guideline on the prevention of TED that has been rapidly adopted by hospital trusts in the UK. The aim of our study was to determine the number and profile of women in our population that would require treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and the cost implications of such treatment if these guidelines were implemented. A retrospective review of the first 100 women who delivered at the Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital (CWIUH) in 2010 was conducted and risk stratification applied at the relevant time points. A total of 51% were deemed to be at intermediate or high risk of TED at some point during pregnancy. In 35 of the 51 women (70%), this risk was attributable to factors such as age>35 years, parity≥3, BMI>30 kg/m2 or cigarette smoking. In our obstetric population, the percentage of women with these risk factors was: 25.5%, 8.5%, 19% and 16.7%, respectively. Implementation of this guideline would increase the hospital annual expenditure on LMWH by a factor of 17. The strategy of attributing risk by accumulating factors that individually have a low risk of TED and are prevalent in the population needs to be re-visited. The cost of implementation of these guidelines is not inconsiderable in the absence of data to indicate that clinical outcome is improved with their implementation.