• Hepatitis C: is there a case for universal screening in pregnancy?

      Martyn, F; Phelan, O; O'Connell, M; Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Coombe Women & Infant's University, Hospital, Dolphin's Barn, Dublin 8. f_martyn@yahoo.com (2012-02-01)
      Hepatitis C (HCV) is not routinely screened for antenatally in all maternity hospitals. Most hospitals adopt a policy of targeted screening. The policy in the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital in Dublin changed from targeted screening in 2006 to universal screening in 2007. We audited the two consecutive years. The prevalence of HCV in our antenatal population was 1.4% for 2006 (67/4666) when targeted screening applied and in 2007--0.71% (66/9222) when universal screening came into affect. One woman in 2007 would not have been detected by targeted screening--1.49% (1/67). Fifty five percent (37/67) of women were HCV-RNA positive in 2006 and 57.5% (38/66) were positive in 2007. We conclude that there were similar detection rates for HCV in 2006 and 2007 and that universal screening is not required if inclusive criteria for selective screening are employed but is of use in research context.
    • Hepatitis C: is there a case for universal screening in pregnancy?

      Martyn, F; Phelan, O; O'Connell, M; Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Coombe Women & Infant's University Hospital, Dolphin's Barn, Dublin 8. f_martyn@yahoo.com (2011-05)
      Hepatitis C (HCV) is not routinely screened for antenatally in all maternity hospitals. Most hospitals adopt a policy of targeted screening. The policy in the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital in Dublin changed from targeted screening in 2006 to universal screening in 2007. We audited the two consecutive years. The prevalence of HCV in our antenatal population was 1.4% for 2006 (67/4666) when targeted screening applied and in 2007--0.71% (66/9222) when universal screening came into affect. One woman in 2007 would not have been detected by targeted screening--1.49% (1/67). Fifty five percent (37/67) of women were HCV-RNA positive in 2006 and 57.5% (38/66) were positive in 2007. We conclude that there were similar detection rates for HCV in 2006 and 2007 and that universal screening is not required if inclusive criteria for selective screening are employed but is of use in research context.