• An audit of caesarean sections for very low birth weight babies.

      Khalifeh, A; Farah, N; Turner, M; UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-02-01)
      This study reviewed caesarean sections for very low birth weight babies in a tertiary referral maternity hospital. Maternal and neonatal complications were recorded and classified according to uterine incision type. We reviewed medical records of 89 women over a period of 2 years. The indication for the caesarean section influenced the type of uterine incision made (p = 0.004). Women who had antepartum haemorrhage were more likely to need a vertical incision. There was also a higher incidence of vertical incisions for gestations <28 weeks (p = 0.029). Surprisingly, when the computerised discharge summaries were reviewed retrospectively, all the vertical uterine incisions were recorded as lower segment caesarean sections. This would have a clinical impact on those women in future pregnancies, especially in a highly mobile population.
    • Body Mass Index (BMI) in women booking for antenatal care: comparison between selfreported and digital measurements.

      Fattah, Chro; Farah, Nadine; O'Toole, Fiona; Barry, Sinead; Stuart, Bernard; Turner, Michael J; UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-02-01)
      OBJECTIVE: We set out to compare measurement of Body Mass Index (BMI) with selfreporting in women early in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: We studied 100 women booking for antenatal care in the first trimester with a normal ongoing pregnancy. Selfreported maternal weight and height were recorded and the Body Mass Index was calculated. Afterwards maternal weight and height were digitally measured and actual BMI was calculated. RESULTS: If selfreporting is used for BMI classification, we found that 22% of women were classified incorrectly when BMI was measured. 12% of the women who were classified as having a normal selfreported BMI were overweight and 5% classified as overweight were obese. Similar findings have been reported outside pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings have implications for clinical practice, and for research studies exploring the relationship between maternal adiposity and pregnancy complications.
    • The measurement of maternal adiposity.

      Fattah, C; Farah, N; Barry, S; O'Connor, N; Stuart, B; Turner, M J; UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2012-02-01)
      The issue of maternal obesity has become a major public health problem. Internationally, the diagnosis of obesity is based on body mass index (BMI) that is, weight in kg/height in m2. While epidemiological associations have been shown between different BMI categories and adverse clinical outcomes, there is also a growing realisation that BMI has significant limitations. In this review, we assess current methods to measure body fat and, in particular, their application in pregnant women.