Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKelly, Ross
dc.contributor.authorFarah, Nadine
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Norah
dc.contributor.authorKennelly, Mairead
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Michael J
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-10T15:41:03Z
dc.date.available2011-08-10T15:41:03Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.citationA comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy. 2011, 51 (2):147-50 Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecolen
dc.identifier.issn1479-828X
dc.identifier.pmid21466517
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01257.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/139355
dc.description.abstract To determine the body mass index (BMI) and the body composition of fathers-to-be and to compare the findings with those of mothers-to-be during early pregnancy.
dc.description.abstract This was a descriptive and comparative study based at a large university teaching hospital. We enrolled men whose partner booked for antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy during July 2009. The height and weight of both parents-to-be were measured digitally, and BMI was calculated. The body compositions of the couple were analysed using bioelectrical impedance.
dc.description.abstract Of 167 fathers-to-be, 14% were obese (BMI > 29.9 kg/m2 ) compared with 16% of mothers-to-be (NS). However, 50% were overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2) ) compared with 26% of mothers-to-be (P < 0.001). This may be explained, in part, because the men were on average two years older than the women, and in the men, BMI increased with age. The men had a lower overall fat percentage (P < 0.001), but their visceral fat was higher than in the women (P < 0.001).
dc.description.abstract Our findings show a high level of obesity in fathers-to-be, which has implications not only for the men themselves but also their families. We suggest that public health interventions directed at obesity during pregnancy should include both parents-to-be.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21466517en
dc.subject.meshAdiposity
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshBody Composition
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
dc.subject.meshFathers
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMothers
dc.subject.meshObesity
dc.subject.meshOverweight
dc.subject.meshPregnancy
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, First
dc.titleA comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstract To determine the body mass index (BMI) and the body composition of fathers-to-be and to compare the findings with those of mothers-to-be during early pregnancy.
html.description.abstract This was a descriptive and comparative study based at a large university teaching hospital. We enrolled men whose partner booked for antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy during July 2009. The height and weight of both parents-to-be were measured digitally, and BMI was calculated. The body compositions of the couple were analysed using bioelectrical impedance.
html.description.abstract Of 167 fathers-to-be, 14% were obese (BMI > 29.9 kg/m2 ) compared with 16% of mothers-to-be (NS). However, 50% were overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2) ) compared with 26% of mothers-to-be (P < 0.001). This may be explained, in part, because the men were on average two years older than the women, and in the men, BMI increased with age. The men had a lower overall fat percentage (P < 0.001), but their visceral fat was higher than in the women (P < 0.001).
html.description.abstract Our findings show a high level of obesity in fathers-to-be, which has implications not only for the men themselves but also their families. We suggest that public health interventions directed at obesity during pregnancy should include both parents-to-be.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record