• Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis: a case report.

      Egan, Aoife M; Larkin, John O; Ryan, Ronan S; Waldron, Ronan; Department of Surgery, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, Co. Mayo, Ireland and, 2Department of Radiology, Mayo General Hospital,Castlebar, Co. Mayo, Ireland., aoife.egan@gmail.com (2012-01-31)
      INTRODUCTION: Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal failure. Clinical features are non-specific and therefore a high index of suspicion must be maintained in patients at risk. Predisposing factors include infection, malignancy and the post-operative state. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a patient who underwent a left hemicolectomy with primary anastomosis and formation of a defunctioning loop ileostomy for an obstructing colon carcinoma at the splenic flexure. En-bloc splenectomy was performed to ensure an oncologic resection. The patient developed a purulent abdominal collection post-operatively and became septic with hypotension and pyrexia. This precipitated acute bilateral adrenal haemorrhage with consequent adrenal insufficiency. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by radiological findings and a co-syntropin test. Following drainage of the collection, antibiotic therapy and corticosteroid replacement, the patient made an excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment of adrenal failure. In their absence, this condition can rapidly lead to death of the patient.
    • Management of the acute scrotum in a district general hospital: 10-year experience.

      Tajchner, Lukas; Larkin, John O; Bourke, Michael G; Waldron, Ronan; Barry, Kevin; Eustace, Paul W; Department of Surgery, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, Co. Mayo, Republic of, Ireland. (2012-01-31)
      The acutely painful scrotum is a common urologic emergency. The primary objective of management is to avoid testicular loss. This requires a high index of clinical suspicion and prompt surgical intervention. In our series conducted between January 1996 and December 2005, 119 patients (age range: 4-62 years) underwent emergency operative exploration for acute scrotal pain. The most common finding was torted cyst of Morgagni (63/119, 52.9%), followed by testicular torsion (41/119, 34.4%). The majority of testicular torsions occurred in the pubertal group (22/41, 53.6%). Only one patient in this group had an unsalvageable testis necessitating orchidectomy, a testicular loss rate in torsion of 2.4%. There were no postoperative wound infections or scrotal haematomas. Testicular salvage depends critically on early surgical intervention, so the delay incurred in diagnostic imaging may extend the period of ischaemia. Furthermore, all radiological investigations have a certain false-negative rate. We advocate immediate surgical exploration of the acute scrotum. We report a low orchidectomy rate (2.4%) in testicular torsion.