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dc.contributor.authorKeating, Annette
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Valerie E M
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:42:40Z
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:42:40Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:42:40Z
dc.identifier.citationMidwifery. 2009 Oct;25(5):518-27. Epub 2008 Jan 28.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-3099 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0266-6138 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18222575en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.midw.2007.08.009en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206212
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: to explore midwives' experiences of facilitating normal birth in an obstetric-led unit. DESIGN: a feminist approach using semi-structured interviews focusing on midwives' perceptions of normal birth and their ability to facilitate this birth option in an obstetric-led unit. SETTING: Ireland. PARTICIPATION: a purposeful sample of 10 midwives with 6-30 years of midwifery experience. All participants had worked for a minimum of 6 years in a labour ward setting, and had been in their current setting for the previous 2 years. FINDINGS: the midwives' narratives related to the following four concepts of patriarchy: 'hierarchical thinking', 'power and prestige', 'a logic of domination' and 'either/or thinking' (dualisms). Two themes, 'hierarchical thinking' and 'either/or thinking', (dualisms) along with their subthemes are presented in this paper. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: this study identified some of the reasons why midwives find it difficult to facilitate normal birth in an obstetric unit setting, and identified a need for further research in this area. Midwifery education and supportive management structures are required if midwives are to become confident practitioners of normal birth.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAnecdotes as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetric/*nursingen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Interprofessional Relationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshJob Descriptionen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaternal Health Services/organization & administrationen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshMidwifery/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Nurse's Roleen_GB
dc.subject.meshNursing Methodology Researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshObstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/*organization & administrationen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Professional Autonomyen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.titleMidwives' experiences of facilitating normal birth in an obstetric-led unit: a feminist perspective.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCentre of Midwifery Education, Fifth floor, Cork University Maternity Hospital,, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. Annette.Keating@mailp.hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalMidwiferyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: to explore midwives' experiences of facilitating normal birth in an obstetric-led unit. DESIGN: a feminist approach using semi-structured interviews focusing on midwives' perceptions of normal birth and their ability to facilitate this birth option in an obstetric-led unit. SETTING: Ireland. PARTICIPATION: a purposeful sample of 10 midwives with 6-30 years of midwifery experience. All participants had worked for a minimum of 6 years in a labour ward setting, and had been in their current setting for the previous 2 years. FINDINGS: the midwives' narratives related to the following four concepts of patriarchy: 'hierarchical thinking', 'power and prestige', 'a logic of domination' and 'either/or thinking' (dualisms). Two themes, 'hierarchical thinking' and 'either/or thinking', (dualisms) along with their subthemes are presented in this paper. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: this study identified some of the reasons why midwives find it difficult to facilitate normal birth in an obstetric unit setting, and identified a need for further research in this area. Midwifery education and supportive management structures are required if midwives are to become confident practitioners of normal birth.


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