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dc.contributor.authorKhalifeh, A
dc.contributor.authorFarah, N
dc.contributor.authorTurner, M
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:57:59Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:57:59Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:57:59Z
dc.identifier.citationJ Obstet Gynaecol. 2010 Apr;30(3):261-3.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1364-6893 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0144-3615 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20373927en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/01443610903531410en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208023
dc.description.abstractThis study reviewed caesarean sections for very low birth weight babies in a tertiary referral maternity hospital. Maternal and neonatal complications were recorded and classified according to uterine incision type. We reviewed medical records of 89 women over a period of 2 years. The indication for the caesarean section influenced the type of uterine incision made (p = 0.004). Women who had antepartum haemorrhage were more likely to need a vertical incision. There was also a higher incidence of vertical incisions for gestations <28 weeks (p = 0.029). Surprisingly, when the computerised discharge summaries were reviewed retrospectively, all the vertical uterine incisions were recorded as lower segment caesarean sections. This would have a clinical impact on those women in future pregnancies, especially in a highly mobile population.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshCesarean Section/methods/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGestational Ageen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Infant, Very Low Birth Weighten_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleAn audit of caesarean sections for very low birth weight babies.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of, Obstetrics and Gynaecologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractThis study reviewed caesarean sections for very low birth weight babies in a tertiary referral maternity hospital. Maternal and neonatal complications were recorded and classified according to uterine incision type. We reviewed medical records of 89 women over a period of 2 years. The indication for the caesarean section influenced the type of uterine incision made (p = 0.004). Women who had antepartum haemorrhage were more likely to need a vertical incision. There was also a higher incidence of vertical incisions for gestations <28 weeks (p = 0.029). Surprisingly, when the computerised discharge summaries were reviewed retrospectively, all the vertical uterine incisions were recorded as lower segment caesarean sections. This would have a clinical impact on those women in future pregnancies, especially in a highly mobile population.


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