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dc.contributor.authorFattah, Chro
dc.contributor.authorFarah, Nadine
dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Sinead
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Michael J
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:58:17Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:58:17Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:58:17Z
dc.identifier.citationEur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2009 May;144(1):32-4. Epub 2009 Mar 5.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1872-7654 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0301-2115 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19268433en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejogrb.2009.01.015en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208033
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: We set out to compare measurement of Body Mass Index (BMI) with selfreporting in women early in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: We studied 100 women booking for antenatal care in the first trimester with a normal ongoing pregnancy. Selfreported maternal weight and height were recorded and the Body Mass Index was calculated. Afterwards maternal weight and height were digitally measured and actual BMI was calculated. RESULTS: If selfreporting is used for BMI classification, we found that 22% of women were classified incorrectly when BMI was measured. 12% of the women who were classified as having a normal selfreported BMI were overweight and 5% classified as overweight were obese. Similar findings have been reported outside pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings have implications for clinical practice, and for research studies exploring the relationship between maternal adiposity and pregnancy complications.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Body Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Weighten_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshObesity/diagnosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Firsten_GB
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Care/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Self Disclosureen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleBody Mass Index (BMI) in women booking for antenatal care: comparison between selfreported and digital measurements.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: We set out to compare measurement of Body Mass Index (BMI) with selfreporting in women early in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: We studied 100 women booking for antenatal care in the first trimester with a normal ongoing pregnancy. Selfreported maternal weight and height were recorded and the Body Mass Index was calculated. Afterwards maternal weight and height were digitally measured and actual BMI was calculated. RESULTS: If selfreporting is used for BMI classification, we found that 22% of women were classified incorrectly when BMI was measured. 12% of the women who were classified as having a normal selfreported BMI were overweight and 5% classified as overweight were obese. Similar findings have been reported outside pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings have implications for clinical practice, and for research studies exploring the relationship between maternal adiposity and pregnancy complications.


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