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dc.contributor.authorKrawczyk, Janusz
dc.contributor.authorAnsar, Naeem
dc.contributor.authorSwords, Ronan
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Tracy
dc.contributor.authorMacDonagh, Barry
dc.contributor.authorMeenaghan, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorHayden, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorHayad, Amjad
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Margaret
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-04T11:34:40Z
dc.date.available2012-04-04T11:34:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-09
dc.identifier.citationClofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia. 2010, 28 (3):118-23 Hematol Oncol
dc.identifier.issn1099-1069
dc.identifier.pmid19768694
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hon.922
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/217638
dc.description.abstractClofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Hematological oncologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdenine Nucleotides
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
dc.subject.meshArabinonucleosides
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myeloid, Acute
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleClofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Haematology, Galway University Hospital and National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
dc.identifier.journalHematological oncology
dc.type.qualificationlevelN/Aen
cr.approval.ethicalN/Aen
dc.description.provinceConnacht
dc.description.provinceConnachten
html.description.abstractClofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.


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