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dc.contributor.authorO’Neill, MB
dc.contributor.authorFreyne, B
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, AJ
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-24T11:16:38Z
dc.date.available2013-09-24T11:16:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302201
dc.description.abstractThis study of paediatric trainees, who were awarded their CSCST from 2005 to 2010, evaluated their training experience and assessed whether the curriculum goals were achieved. From an incomplete database 23 (57.7%) graduates based in Ireland and 3(19%) based abroad responded. Twenty one (81%) of respondents were currently working in Ireland as consultants, 20(80%) had a post membership qualification and 23 (92%) had travelled abroad for fellowships. Positive experiences included clinical training (44%), positive role models (44%), quality of the training days (52%).Negative experiences included lack of protected time for research (52%), excessive clinical service (28%), and poor monitoring of trainers (20%). Mean Likert scores for curriculum competencies were clinical care 4.9, clinical knowledge 5, application of evidence 3.7, academic supervisor skills3.3, knowledge of public health 3.2, health economics 2.2, and healthcare systems modification 2.3. The curriculum deficiencies can be addressed through the diploma in Leadership and Quality in Healthcare which has been developed by the Health Service Executive and the College of Physicians but an adequate database of graduates needs to be maintained.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.titleHigher specialist training in paediatrics 2005-2010.The graduates reflectionsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceConnachten
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T07:51:29Z
html.description.abstractThis study of paediatric trainees, who were awarded their CSCST from 2005 to 2010, evaluated their training experience and assessed whether the curriculum goals were achieved. From an incomplete database 23 (57.7%) graduates based in Ireland and 3(19%) based abroad responded. Twenty one (81%) of respondents were currently working in Ireland as consultants, 20(80%) had a post membership qualification and 23 (92%) had travelled abroad for fellowships. Positive experiences included clinical training (44%), positive role models (44%), quality of the training days (52%).Negative experiences included lack of protected time for research (52%), excessive clinical service (28%), and poor monitoring of trainers (20%). Mean Likert scores for curriculum competencies were clinical care 4.9, clinical knowledge 5, application of evidence 3.7, academic supervisor skills3.3, knowledge of public health 3.2, health economics 2.2, and healthcare systems modification 2.3. The curriculum deficiencies can be addressed through the diploma in Leadership and Quality in Healthcare which has been developed by the Health Service Executive and the College of Physicians but an adequate database of graduates needs to be maintained.


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