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dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, R
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Z
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, A
dc.contributor.authorSayers, G
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-31T08:33:43Z
dc.date.available2014-07-31T08:33:43Z
dc.date.issued1999-04
dc.identifier.citationMcDonnell R et al. Folic acid knowledge and use among expectant mothers in 1997: a comparison with 1996. Ir Med J. 1999, 92 (3):296-9en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid10394755
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324034
dc.descriptionThis study examined changes in folic acid knowledge and use among antenatal women in Dublin maternity hospitals between 1996 and 1997, following a campaign to improve the very low uptake of peri-conceptional folic acid. The results showed significant improvements between the two years. Almost 76% of respondents had heard of folic acid in 1997 compared with 54% in 1996 (p < 0.01), with a shift in the proportion of people hearing of folic acid from hospital doctors to general practitioners (GP). Almost 43% of respondents in 1997 knew that folic acid can prevent spina bifida compared with 21% in 1996 (p < 0.01). A higher proportion was taking folic acid prior to conception in 1997 (16% vs 6%, p < 0.01). We conclude that the improvements may have been in part due to the promotional campaign among health professionals, women's groups and the media. However, less than a fifth of women were taking folic acid peri-conceptionally in 1997 and there is still scope for much improvement.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis study examined changes in folic acid knowledge and use among antenatal women in Dublin maternity hospitals between 1996 and 1997, following a campaign to improve the very low uptake of peri-conceptional folic acid. The results showed significant improvements between the two years. Almost 76% of respondents had heard of folic acid in 1997 compared with 54% in 1996 (p < 0.01), with a shift in the proportion of people hearing of folic acid from hospital doctors to general practitioners (GP). Almost 43% of respondents in 1997 knew that folic acid can prevent spina bifida compared with 21% in 1996 (p < 0.01). A higher proportion was taking folic acid prior to conception in 1997 (16% vs 6%, p < 0.01). We conclude that the improvements may have been in part due to the promotional campaign among health professionals, women's groups and the media. However, less than a fifth of women were taking folic acid peri-conceptionally in 1997 and there is still scope for much improvement.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10394755en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subjectFOLIC ACIDen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshDemography
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFolic Acid
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshMarital Status
dc.subject.meshObstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital
dc.subject.meshParity
dc.subject.meshPregnancy
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Care
dc.titleFolic acid knowledge and use among expectant mothers in 1997: a comparison with 1996.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Information Unit Eastern Health Board, Dr. Steeven's Hospital, Dublin. bmcdonnell@ehbhiu.iol.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
html.description.abstractThis study examined changes in folic acid knowledge and use among antenatal women in Dublin maternity hospitals between 1996 and 1997, following a campaign to improve the very low uptake of peri-conceptional folic acid. The results showed significant improvements between the two years. Almost 76% of respondents had heard of folic acid in 1997 compared with 54% in 1996 (p < 0.01), with a shift in the proportion of people hearing of folic acid from hospital doctors to general practitioners (GP). Almost 43% of respondents in 1997 knew that folic acid can prevent spina bifida compared with 21% in 1996 (p < 0.01). A higher proportion was taking folic acid prior to conception in 1997 (16% vs 6%, p < 0.01). We conclude that the improvements may have been in part due to the promotional campaign among health professionals, women's groups and the media. However, less than a fifth of women were taking folic acid peri-conceptionally in 1997 and there is still scope for much improvement.


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