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dc.contributor.authorCallinan, J.
dc.contributor.authorMcGarr, O
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T09:56:28Z
dc.date.available2016-12-21T09:56:28Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-09
dc.identifier.citationCallinan J & McGarr O (2016) E-Learners in Palliative Care Educationen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/620995
dc.description“Education is a core component of specialist palliative care (DOHC 2001).. How do learners perceive e-learning in palliative care education and what are the challenges to its uptake? Aim: To understand the barriers to adopting e-learning in palliative care in Ireland by clinical staff and to examine how we can facilitate e-learning for those undertaking e-learning courses . Methods: Postal and online questionnaires were distributed to hospice services on the Island of Ireland inviting clinical staff from specialist palliative inpatient units, homecare / community and palliative day care services to participate in the study. Results: The average response rate obtained across 6 sites was approx 35% (n= 397). Respondent´s perceived confidence carrying out different computer tasks was high with 62% feeling confident using E-Learning even if they had never used it before. Sixty-seven per cent indicated that having limited time would be a challenge and analysis of open-ended responses highlighted not having protected time during work as an inhibitor. There was a preference for face to face interaction by 54%. Nearly ⅓ indicated that remaining motivated would be a particular challenge. Approx 27% indicated lack of computer skills, lack of confidence and a requirement for technical or other support as factors preventing them using E-Learning. Relating to course design, modules should be short and interactive with a sharing of ideas with others in your field”. An analysis of qualitative data found that approx. ⅓ respondents highlighted the importance of face to face interaction. • “lack of opportunity for impromptu engagement/group dialogue” • “I think Palliative care education is enhanced by personal and group interaction” • “unable to ask questions as you go”. Concerns: “Risk of limited study leave/ support from work organisation as the time spent on E-Learning is hidden”. “Difficulty getting time to go out for study days, can do it (E-Learning) if and when you have time” Emphasis on courses which are accredited to “Update palliative skills and knowledge” and in “Meeting the criteria for professional CPD”. Participating in e-learning is dependent on the course design such as having deadlines to keep you motivated, blended learning and well-designed courses. Conclusions: Critical facilitators for e-learners ranked in order of importance are: 1) Dedicated protected time to participate in E-Learning 2) Quick technical and administrative support 3) Dedicated computer training before completing an E-Learning course 4) Regular contact with the educator in online course work.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectE-LEARNINGen
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen
dc.subjectCONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTen
dc.titleE-Learners in palliative care education - what do they really want?en
dc.typeConference Posteren
dc.contributor.departmentMilford Care Centre; University of Limericken
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T18:32:49Z


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