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dc.contributor.authorKlimas, J
dc.contributor.authorSmall, W
dc.contributor.authorAhamad, K
dc.contributor.authorCullen, W
dc.contributor.authorMead, A
dc.contributor.authorRieb, L
dc.contributor.authorWood, E
dc.contributor.authorMcNeil, R
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-23T12:12:39Z
dc.date.available2018-04-23T12:12:39Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationBarriers and facilitators to implementing addiction medicine fellowships: a qualitative study with fellows, medical students, residents and preceptors. 2017, 12 (1):21 Addict Sci Clin Practen
dc.identifier.issn1940-0640
dc.identifier.pmid28927448
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13722-017-0086-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/622957
dc.description.abstractAlthough progress in science has driven advances in addiction medicine, this subject has not been adequately taught to medical trainees and physicians. As a result, there has been poor integration of evidence-based practices in addiction medicine into physician training which has impeded addiction treatment and care. Recently, a number of training initiatives have emerged internationally, including the addiction medicine fellowships in Vancouver, Canada. This study was undertaken to examine barriers and facilitators of implementing addiction medicine fellowships.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Canadian Institutes of Health Research (MOP–81171) and the US National Institutes of Health (R01DA033147) supported the study. This research was also undertaken, in part, by funding from the Canada Research Chairs program through a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Inner City Medicine, and by the US National Institutes of Health (R25DA037756) that supports Dr. Evan Wood. The ELEVATE grant: Irish Research Council International Career Development Fellowship—co-funded by Marie Cure Actions (ELEVATEPD/2014/6); and a European Commission (701698) grants—supported Dr. Jan Klimas. The European Commission (HepCare) grant supports Dr. Walter Cullen. Drs Ryan McNeil and Will Small are supported by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. Ryan McNeil is also supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBiomed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttps://ascpjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13722-017-0086-9en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Addiction science & clinical practiceen
dc.subjectADDICTIONen
dc.subjectMEDICAL EDUCATIONen
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Addictive
dc.subject.meshCanada
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence
dc.subject.meshFellowships and Scholarships
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Needs and Demand
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshSpecialization
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disorders
dc.subject.otherFELLOWSHIPSen
dc.titleBarriers and facilitators to implementing addiction medicine fellowships: a qualitative study with fellows, medical students, residents and preceptors.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAddiction science & clinical practiceen
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-03T09:27:42Z
html.description.abstractAlthough progress in science has driven advances in addiction medicine, this subject has not been adequately taught to medical trainees and physicians. As a result, there has been poor integration of evidence-based practices in addiction medicine into physician training which has impeded addiction treatment and care. Recently, a number of training initiatives have emerged internationally, including the addiction medicine fellowships in Vancouver, Canada. This study was undertaken to examine barriers and facilitators of implementing addiction medicine fellowships.


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