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dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Maire
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-24T10:10:01Z
dc.date.available2019-12-24T10:10:01Z
dc.date.issued1993-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/626995
dc.descriptionSchool Health Services developed in the early part of this century precipitated by the health of men recruited for the Boer War. The service has continued with various modifications since then. In 1967, the review of Child Health Services provided guidelines for what children should have developmental examinations e.g. towns of certain population sizes, as well as school health services. By virtue of these recommendations all children living in Dublin should have a developmental examination. In the 1980's, due largely to pressure of manpower/resources as well as to the questionable yield, selected school medical examinations came into being in some areas, where, depending on the information supplied by parents, a child was or was not selected for a medical examination. Vision and hearing tests continued to be given to all at some stage in their primary school life. Since the start of the century, health, in general, has improved in conjunction with nutrition and general living conditions. Vaccination programmes have been developed and parental education/awareness increased. Developmental examinations at 9/12 are available to all in the Dublin area, as are visits from Public Health Nurse up to the age of 6 yrs. The majority of children are now born in hospital with Paediatricians and so have Paediatric Neonatal checks. Developmental checks at 6 weeks of age are also available from G.P.'s and Maternity Hospitals. With all these developments, the yield from general school medical examinations should be minimal if not zero. Should the service continue in its present format for such a small return? Increasingly the problems noted by parents and teachers - which aren't already under treatment - are social and behavioural problems. The "new morbidities" which children are now exposed to, such as anti-social behaviour, substance abuse, non-accidental injury accidents and suicides are presenting a challenge. The World Health Organisations is of no doubt that the changing patterns of child morbidity in industrialised societies demand a new and dynamic response from school health service. Shrinking economic resources and awareness of the potential for prevention makes it desirable to reconsider how health services, health education and the school environment can contribute to improve health.en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEastern Health Boarden_US
dc.rightsEastern Health Board
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICESen_US
dc.subjectSCHOOLSen_US
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_US
dc.subjectHEALTH PROMOTIONen_US
dc.titleSchool Health Services: A Brief Reviewen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.departmentEastern Health Boarden_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-24T10:10:01Z


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