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dc.contributor.authorHeffernan, Shane Michael
dc.contributor.authorHorner, Katy
dc.contributor.authorDe Vito, Giuseppe
dc.contributor.authorConway, Gillian Eileen
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-05T12:22:32Z
dc.date.available2020-03-05T12:22:32Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-24
dc.identifier.pmid30909645
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu11030696
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/627266
dc.descriptionMinerals and trace elements (MTEs) are micronutrients involved in hundreds of biological processes. Deficiency in MTEs can negatively affect athletic performance. Approximately 50% of athletes have reported consuming some form of micronutrient supplement; however, there is limited data confirming their efficacy for improving performance. The aim of this study was to systematically review the role of MTEs in exercise and athletic performance. Six electronic databases and grey literature sources (MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL and SportDISCUS; Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov) were searched, in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Results: 17,433 articles were identified and 130 experiments from 128 studies were included. Retrieved articles included Iron (n = 29), Calcium (n = 11), Magnesium, (n = 22), Phosphate (n = 17), Zinc (n = 9), Sodium (n = 15), Boron (n = 4), Selenium (n = 5), Chromium (n = 12) and multi-mineral articles (n = 5). No relevant articles were identified for Copper, Manganese, Iodine, Nickel, Fluoride or Cobalt. Only Iron and Magnesium included articles of sufficient quality to be assigned as 'strong'. Currently, there is little evidence to support the use of MTE supplementation to improve physiological markers of athletic performance, with the possible exception of Iron (in particular, biological situations) and Magnesium as these currently have the strongest quality evidence. Regardless, some MTEs may possess the potential to improve athletic performance, but more high quality research is required before support for these MTEs can be given. PROSPERO preregistered (CRD42018090502).en_US
dc.description.abstractMinerals and trace elements (MTEs) are micronutrients involved in hundreds of biological processes. Deficiency in MTEs can negatively affect athletic performance. Approximately 50% of athletes have reported consuming some form of micronutrient supplement; however, there is limited data confirming their efficacy for improving performance. The aim of this study was to systematically review the role of MTEs in exercise and athletic performance. Six electronic databases and grey literature sources (MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL and SportDISCUS; Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov) were searched, in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Results: 17,433 articles were identified and 130 experiments from 128 studies were included. Retrieved articles included Iron (n = 29), Calcium (n = 11), Magnesium, (n = 22), Phosphate (n = 17), Zinc (n = 9), Sodium (n = 15), Boron (n = 4), Selenium (n = 5), Chromium (n = 12) and multi-mineral articles (n = 5). No relevant articles were identified for Copper, Manganese, Iodine, Nickel, Fluoride or Cobalt. Only Iron and Magnesium included articles of sufficient quality to be assigned as 'strong'. Currently, there is little evidence to support the use of MTE supplementation to improve physiological markers of athletic performance, with the possible exception of Iron (in particular, biological situations) and Magnesium as these currently have the strongest quality evidence. Regardless, some MTEs may possess the potential to improve athletic performance, but more high quality research is required before support for these MTEs can be given. PROSPERO preregistered (CRD42018090502).
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectergogenic aidsen_US
dc.subjectexercise and sport nutritionen_US
dc.subjectmuscle functionen_US
dc.subjectnutritional supplementsen_US
dc.subjectphysical performanceen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643
dc.identifier.journalNutrientsen_US
dc.source.journaltitleNutrients
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue3
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T12:22:33Z
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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