Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorConyard, Karl
dc.contributor.authorCodd, Mary
dc.contributor.authorMetcalfe, Alison
dc.contributor.authorCorish, Siobhán
dc.contributor.authorFlannery, Jackie
dc.contributor.authorHannon, Paul
dc.contributor.authorRusk, Brian
dc.contributor.authorYeates, Simon
dc.contributor.authorBahramian, Katayoun
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-27T14:09:24Z
dc.date.available2020-03-27T14:09:24Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.citationConyard KF, Metcalfe A, Corish S, Flannery J, Hannon P, Rusk B, Yeates S, Codd MB. (2020) Healthcare assistants and qualified carers, A Trained, but untapped underutilised resource: A population-based study in Ireland. Dublin : HCA and Carers Ireland & Centre for Support and Training in Analysis and Research, University College Dublin.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/627406
dc.descriptionThis report addresses aspects of the function, wellbeing and satisfaction of healthcare assistants and qualified carers in Ireland. The study on which it is based was undertaken under the auspices of the Irish Healthcare Assistants and Carers Ireland Social Association. It set out to elicit the views of carers about their background, training, skillset, work environments and conditions, career satisfaction and aspirations and is based on responses from almost 2,000 healthcare assistants and carers. It is the first study of its kind in Ireland. The report provides a historical perspectives on the evolution of the caring role in Ireland and internationally with the development of hospitals and healthcare. In parallel with this there have been changes in the perception of the role and those who carry it out, the training required and in the value placed on it by society. Education of nurses emerged primarily from the wartime experiences of the 19th and 20th centuries and has evolved into specialists areas over the ensuing time period in the last three decades healthcare assistants (HCAs) have become a distinct group and a career track in its own right. Formal training for HCAs and Carers in Ireland began in the 1990s with the Vocational Educational Committee’s National Council for Vocational Awards (NCVA). With the training of this new group of health care workers, the grade of Health Care Assistant (including maternity HCAs) was introduced in 2001. These were incorporated as members of the healthcare team to assist and support the nursing, midwifery, medical and allied health teams.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCentre for Support and Training in Analysis and Research at University College Dublin (UCD CSTAR)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity College Dublinen_US
dc.subjectHEALTHCARE ASSISTANTSen_US
dc.subjectCARERSen_US
dc.subjectWELLBEINGen_US
dc.subjectPROFESSIONAL ROLEen_US
dc.subjectCAREER DEVELOPMENTen_US
dc.titleHealthcare Assistants and Qualified Carers, a trained, but untapped underutilised resource: A population-based study in Ireland of skillset, career satisfaction, wellbeing and change across all sectors and care settingsen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversirt College Dublinen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorIrish Healthcare Assistants and Carers Ireland Social Associationen
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-27T14:09:25Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
hca&cstar_ final report.pdf
Size:
9.652Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record