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dc.contributor.authorSulaiman, Amal Al-Shaikh
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Marie
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Mairead
dc.contributor.authorEva-Bamiou, Doris
dc.contributor.authorPavlou, Marousa
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T16:51:54Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T16:51:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-11
dc.identifier.citationPhysiotherapy Practice and Research, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 155-162, 2020en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/PPR-190394
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/628938
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Functional mobility requires an ability to adapt to environmental factors together with an ability to execute a secondary task simultaneously while walking. A complex dual-tasking gait test may provide an indication of functional ability and falls risk among community-dwelling older adults. PURPOSE:The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate age-related differences in dual-tasking ability and to evaluate whether dual-tasking ability is related to executive function. METHODS:Forty-one community-dwelling healthy older and forty-one younger adults completed a dual-tasking assessment in which concurrent tasks were incorporated into the Functional Gait Assessment (FGA). The manual dual-task involved carrying a glass of water (FGA-M) while the cognitive dual-tasks involved numeracy (FGA-N) and literacy (FGA-L) related tasks. FGA scores under single (FGA-S) and dual-task conditions together with associated dual-task costs and response accuracy were determined. Executive function was assessed using The Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS). RESULTS:FGA-N and FGA-L scores were adversely affected in both groups compared to FGA-S (p≤0.001). However, score reductions and dual-task costs were significantly greater for older adults compared to younger adults on FGA-N (p≤0.05) and FGA-L (p≤0.001), with older adult performance on FGA-N associated with falls risk (p≤0.05). Executive function did not appear to be related to dual-tasking ability. CONCLUSION:Findings suggest that cognitively demanding tasks while walking, have a deleterious effect on dynamic balance and could place older adults at a greater risk of falls.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOS Pressen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://content.iospress.com/articles/physiotherapy-practice-and-research/ppr190394?resultNumber=0&totalResults=1&start=0&q=kellym19%40tcd.ie&resultsPageSize=10&rows=10en_US
dc.subjectAGEINGen_US
dc.subjectFALLSen_US
dc.subjectEXECUTIVE FUNCTIONen_US
dc.subjectCOGNITIVE FUNCTIONen_US
dc.titleDual tasking interferes with dynamic balance in young and old healthy adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalPhysiotherapy Practice and Researchen_US
dc.description.provinceMunsteren_US
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-05T16:51:55Z


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