• Delayed cystic fibrosis presentation in children in the absence of newborn screening.

      Jackson, A; Foley, L; Daly, L; Fitzpatrick, P; Harrington, M; Zhou, S; Kelleher, C; UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, Woodview Hse, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4. abaigeal.jackson@ucd.ie (2010-04)
      Newborn cystic fibrosis (CF) screening facilitates early diagnosis and nutritional intervention, which prevents malnourishment and improves growth in childhood. To provide baseline information on the natural history of CF in the Republic of Ireland, where newborn screening has not yet been introduced and CF incidence is high (1:1353 live births), we examined the effect of presentation mode, symptom type and gender on age at diagnosis. Median age at diagnosis was calculated by gender and for presentation mode/symptom type for 601 CF registry children diagnosed 1986-2007. Modes of presentation were each significantly associated with delayed presentation. An adjusted odds ratio of 4.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 11.1) was determined for presentation with family history, 43.1 for gastrointestinal symptoms presentation (95% CI: 18.3, 101.4), 96.9 for both respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms (95% CI: 38.6, 243,4), and 115.4 for respiratory symptoms (95% CI: 45.2, 294.7). Children with respiratory symptoms had the greatest likelihood of delayed diagnosis (median age: 20.4 months), followed by those with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms (9.2 months). Gender was not significantly associated with a delayed presentation when presentation mode was taken into account.
    • Newborn hearing screening: a regional example for national care.

      Adelola, O A; Papanikolaou, V; Gormley, P; Lang, J; Keogh, I J; Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Galway University Hospitals, Galway. adelolab@hotmail.com (2010-05)
      Congenital Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment (PCHI) is known to have a negative effect on language acquisition, cognitive development and social integration. Since 2000 our department has implemented a UNHS program in the West of Ireland. We describe our experience and detail our results to date. All neonates born from October 2000 to November 2007 were screened using a 2-stage protocol. Transient evoked oto-acoustic emissions (TEOAEs) were used to screen all neonates, followed by automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) in those who did not pass TEOAE, and all neonates at audiological risk. 26,281 babies were born over the eight year period. 25,742 underwent the screening process, achieving a coverage rate of 98%. The prevalence of PCHI in the population tested was 1.21/1000 live births (31/25,731). Our results show that a hospital based 2-stage UNHS protocol using TEOAEs and AABR is accurate, feasible and effective.