• Exploring healthcare assistants' role and experience in pain assessment and management for people with advanced dementia towards the end of life: a qualitative study.

      Jansen, Bannin De Witt; Brazil, Kevin; Passmore, Peter; Buchanan, Hilary; Maxwell, Doreen; McIlfatrick, Sonja J; Morgan, Sharon M; Watson, Max; Parsons, Carole; Our Lady's Hospice & Care Services (BioMed Central, 2017-01-19)
      Pain assessment and management are key aspects in the care of people with dementia approaching the end of life but become challenging when patient self-report is impaired or unavailable. Best practice recommends the use of observational pain assessments for these patients; however, difficulties have been documented with health professionals' use of these tools in the absence of additional collateral patient knowledge. No studies have explored the role, perspectives and experiences of healthcare assistants in pain assessment and management in dementia; this study provides insight into this important area.
    • Femoro-acetabular impingement and hip pain with conventionally normal x-rays.

      Baker, J F; Mulhall, K J; Orthopaedic Research Foundation, Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry, Dublin 9. (2010-06)
      There has in recent years been a fundamental change in the understanding of hip pain in the young adult and hip pain without plain radiographic findings of arthritis. Pain in these groups has long represented a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. With new appreciation of hip biomechanics, pathological processes and the arrival of modern imaging modalities we now have a greater understanding of non-arthritic hip pathology. One of the commonest yet least well recognized 'new' diagnoses around the hip is femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). FAI is a developmental condition of the hip joint that is associated with abnormal anatomical configuration and thus joint mechanics on either the femoral or acetabular sides or both. It is hypothesized to have a variety of precipitants and may ultimately lead to labral and chondral injury and what has previously been referred to as 'primary' or 'idiopathic' hip osteoarthritis.
    • Patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy for musculoskeletal pain.

      Casserley-Feeney, Sarah N; Phelan, Martin; Duffy, Fionnuala; Roush, Susan; Cairns, Melinda C; Hurley, Deirdre A; School of Physiotherapy & Performance Science, University College Dublin, Ireland. sarah.casserley@ucd.ie (2008)
      BACKGROUND: Despite emphasis on patient centred healthcare, healthcare professionals have been slow to use validated measurements of patient satisfaction in physiotherapy practice. The aim of this cross sectional survey was to measure patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy in Ireland, for patients with musculoskeletal pain, using a previously validated survey instrument. METHODS: A multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire 'PTOPS', which assesses patient satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy treatment, was translated from American English to European English, and relevant demographic and global satisfaction items were included. This was then circulated to patients with musculoskeletal pain (n = 240) for anonymous completion and return to the research team. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, v.12). RESULTS: In total 55% (n = 131/240) of questionnaires were returned. Just over half of the respondents were male (53.4%, n = 70), with a mean age (SD) of 37.7 years (12.4), and had previous experience of physiotherapy (65.6%, n = 86). The most common site of musculoskeletal pain was spinal (51.5% n = 66). The mean (SD) number of treatments was 8.3 (8.3), at a mean total cost (SD) of 350.2 euros (322.8 euros). The 'PTOPS' questionnaire categorised and scored satisfaction items under four domains, Enhancer, Detractor, Location and Cost. The mean score (SD), optimum score, and scoring range for each domain were: 'Enhancer' 41.2 (3.8), 50, 10-50; 'Detractor' 19.4 (4.4), 10, 10-50; 'Location' 28.0 (4.1), 35, 7-35; 'Cost' 18.9 (2.8), 7, 7-35. "Overall satisfaction with physiotherapy experience" was scored on a five-point scale "excellent to poor", with a modal response of "Very Good" (42%; n = 55). CONCLUSION: This study measured patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal pain in Ireland using a previously validated outcome measure and provides a template for future studies of this increasingly important topic. Results demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with all components of physiotherapy treatment, except cost, and provided valuable patient feedback regarding their physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal pain. Results can be used by physiotherapists to improve future patient experiences with a view to improving patient attendance and compliance with physiotherapy treatment protocols for patients with musculoskeletal pain.
    • Self-rated health and quality of life in adults attending regional disability services in Ireland.

      Boland, Máirín C; Daly, Leslie; Staines, Anthony; UCD School of Public Health and Population Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. mairin.boland@hse.ie (2009-04)
      There is limited background information on self-rated health in people with disability in Ireland. This paper examines self-rated health scores and dimensions of functioning in people attending disability services and compares scores to the general population in Ireland, which has not been done before.