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dc.contributor.authorDe Lappe, Niall
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Jean O
dc.contributor.authorDoran, Geraldine
dc.contributor.authorDevane, Genevieve
dc.contributor.authorCormican, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-30T14:18:54Z
dc.date.available2010-03-30T14:18:54Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationRole of subtyping in detecting Salmonella cross contamination in the laboratory. 2009, 9:155 BMC Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2180
dc.identifier.pmid19646244
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2180-9-155
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/95263
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: With the exception of M. tuberculosis, little has been published on the problems of cross-contamination in bacteriology laboratories. We performed a retrospective analysis of subtyping data from the National Salmonella Reference Laboratory (Ireland) from 2000-2007 to identify likely incidents of laboratory cross contamination. METHODS: Serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all Salmonella isolates received in the NSRL. Phage typing was performed on all S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis isolates while multi-locus variance analysis (MLVA) was performed on selected S. Typhimurium isolates. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the PulseNet standard protocol was performed on selected isolates of various serovars. RESULTS: Twenty-three incidents involving fifty-six isolates were identified as likely to represent cross contamination. The probable sources of contamination identified were the laboratory positive control isolate (n = 13), other test isolates (n = 9) or proficiency test samples (n = 1). CONCLUSION: The scale of laboratory cross-contamination in bacteriology is most likely under recognized. Testing laboratories should be aware of the potential for cross-contamination, regularly review protocols to minimize its occurrence and consider it as a possibility when unexpected results are obtained.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBacteriophage Typing
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
dc.subject.meshEquipment Contamination
dc.subject.meshFood Contamination
dc.subject.meshFood Microbiology
dc.subject.meshLaboratories
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Tests
dc.subject.meshSalmonella
dc.subject.meshSerotyping
dc.titleRole of subtyping in detecting Salmonella cross contamination in the laboratory.en
dc.contributor.departmentNational Salmonella Reference Laboratory, Department of Medical Microbiology, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. niall.delappe@hse.ieen
dc.identifier.journalBMC microbiologyen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-03T10:40:17Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: With the exception of M. tuberculosis, little has been published on the problems of cross-contamination in bacteriology laboratories. We performed a retrospective analysis of subtyping data from the National Salmonella Reference Laboratory (Ireland) from 2000-2007 to identify likely incidents of laboratory cross contamination. METHODS: Serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all Salmonella isolates received in the NSRL. Phage typing was performed on all S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis isolates while multi-locus variance analysis (MLVA) was performed on selected S. Typhimurium isolates. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the PulseNet standard protocol was performed on selected isolates of various serovars. RESULTS: Twenty-three incidents involving fifty-six isolates were identified as likely to represent cross contamination. The probable sources of contamination identified were the laboratory positive control isolate (n = 13), other test isolates (n = 9) or proficiency test samples (n = 1). CONCLUSION: The scale of laboratory cross-contamination in bacteriology is most likely under recognized. Testing laboratories should be aware of the potential for cross-contamination, regularly review protocols to minimize its occurrence and consider it as a possibility when unexpected results are obtained.


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