Ireland's central source for Open Access health research 


Lenus, the Irish Health Research repository is the leading source for Irish research in health and social care.  The Lenus collections include peer reviewed journal articles, grey literature, dissertations, reports and conference presentations. Lenus contains the publications of the Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) and the collected research output of over 130 health organisations past and present are all freely accessible. 

Submit Your Research to Lenus 

If you are an Irish Researcher or have conducted research in an Irish Institution or Health Organisation you can add your published research to Lenus. Submitted articles must be available in Open Access format or the publishers policy permit author self archiving. Advice on Open Access publishing and publishers policies are available on the 'Open Access Publishing Guide' and 'publishers' policies' pages available on the left.     

SUBMIT NOW 


HSE Open Access Research Awards 2018 - Winners To Be Announced December 7th

Thank You to everyone who submitted an entry to the annual HSE Open Access Research awards. Entries are now closed and are being processed by the judging panel. Winners will be announced at the Open Access Awards ceremony on December 7th.       

 


Sign up for Lenus Spotlights 

The Lenus spotlights email newsletter delivers the pick of recent Lenus articles and reports plus news on open access events directly to your inbox.  

SIGN UP 

   

  • CD10/ALDH cells are the sole cisplatin-resistant component of a novel ovarian cancer stem cell hierarchy.

    Ffrench, Brendan; Gasch, Claudia; Hokamp, Karsten; Spillane, Cathy; Blackshields, Gordon; Mahgoub, Thamir Mahmoud; Bates, Mark; Kehoe, Louise; Mooney, Aoibhinn; Doyle, Ronan; Doyle, Brendan; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile; Gleeson, Noreen; Hennessy, Bryan T; Stordal, Britta; O'Riain, Ciaran; Lambkin, Helen; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Gallagher, Michael F; 1 Department of Histopathology, Trinity College Dublin, Central Pathology Laboratory, St. James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. 2 Pathology Research Laboratory, Coombe Women and Infant's University Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. 3 Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. 4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Trinity College Dublin, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St. James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. 5 School of Biological Sciences, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin, Ireland. 6 Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, St. James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. 7 Department of Molecular Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. 8 Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon, London, UK. (Springer Nature, 2017-10-19)
    It is long established that tumour-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess chemoresistant properties. However, little is known of the mechanisms involved, particularly with respect to the organisation of CSCs as stem-progenitor-differentiated cell hierarchies. Here we aimed to elucidate the relationship between CSC hierarchies and chemoresistance in an ovarian cancer model. Using a single cell-based approach to CSC discovery and validation, we report a novel, four-component CSC hierarchy based around the markers cluster of differentiation 10 (CD10) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). In a change to our understanding of CSC biology, resistance to chemotherapy drug cisplatin was found to be the sole property of CD10
  • Congenital Anomalies Cork & Kerry Newsletter; Vol 7(1) 2017

    Health Service Executive (HSE) South (Cork & Kerry), Department of Public Health (Health Service Executive (HSE) South (Cork & Kerry), Department of Public Health, 2017)
  • The characterization of an intestine-like genomic signature maintained during Barrett's-associated adenocarcinogenesis reveals an NR5A2-mediated promotion of cancer cell survival.

    Duggan, Shane P; Behan, Fiona M; Kirca, Murat; Zaheer, Abdul; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Reynolds, John V; Vaz, Gisela M F; Senge, Mathias O; Kelleher, Dermot; 1 Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, 2775 Laurel Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 2 Life Science Institute, 2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 3 Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, St James' Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. 4 Department of Gastroenterology, St James' Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. 5 Department of Surgery, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, St James' Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. 6 Medicinal Chemistry, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin, St James' Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. (Nature Publishing Group, 2016-09-02)
    Barrett's oesophagus (BO), an intestinal-type metaplasia (IM), typically arising in conjunction with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, is a prominent risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The molecular similarities between IM and normal intestinal tissues are ill-defined. Consequently, the contribution of intestine-enriched factors expressed within BO to oncogenesis is unclear. Herein, using transcriptomics we define the intestine-enriched genes expressed in meta-profiles of BO and OAC. Interestingly, 77% of the genes differentially expressed in a meta-profile of BO were similarly expressed in intestinal tissues. Furthermore, 85% of this intestine-like signature was maintained upon transition to OAC. Gene networking analysis of transcription factors within this signature revealed a network centred upon NR5A2, GATA6 and FOXA2, whose over-expression was determined in a cohort of BO and OAC patients. Simulated acid reflux was observed to induce the expression of both NR5A2 and GATA6. Using siRNA-mediated silencing and an NR5A2 antagonist we demonstrate that NR5A2-mediated cancer cell survival is facilitated through augmentation of GATA6 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL-XL levels. Abrogation of NR5A2-GATA6 expression in conjunction with BCL-XL co-silencing resulted in synergistically increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and photo-dynamic therapeutics. These findings characterize the intestine-like signature associated with IM which may have important consequences to adenocarcinogenesis.
  • Self-management needs of Irish adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): how can a Canadian web-based programme meet these needs?

    O'Sullivan, Grace; O'Higgins, Siobhán; Caes, Line; Saetes, Sophia; McGuire, Brian E; Stinson, Jennifer (Pediatric Rheumatology, 2018-11-08)
    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) affects over 1000 children and adolescents in Ireland, potentially impacting health-related quality-of-life. Accessible self-management strategies, including Internet-based interventions, can support adolescents in Ireland where specialist rheumatology care is geographically-centralised within the capital city. This study interviewed adolescents with JIA, their parents, and healthcare professionals to (i) explore the self-management needs of Irish adolescents; and (ii) evaluate the acceptability of an adapted version of a Canadian JIA self-management programme (Teens Taking Charge: Managing Arthritis Online, or TTC) for Irish users. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with Irish adolescents with JIA (N = 16), their parents (N = 13), and Irish paediatric healthcare professionals (HCPs; N = 22). Adolescents were aged 12-18 (M Five themes emerged: independent self-management; acquiring skills and knowledge to manage JIA; unique challenges of JIA in Ireland; views on web-based interventions; and understanding through social support. Adolescents acknowledged the need for independent self-management and gradually took additional responsibilities to achieve this goal. However, they felt they lacked information to manage their condition independently. Parents and adolescents emphasised the need for social support and felt a peer-support scheme could provide additional benefit to adolescents if integrated within the TTC programme. All participants endorsed the TTC programme to gain knowledge about JIA and offered suggestions to make the programme relevant to Irish users. There is scope for providing easily-accessible, accurate information to Irish families with JIA. The acceptability of adapting an existing JIA self-management intervention for Irish users was confirmed.
  • Implications for reflective practice and safer care in paramedicine: The Bawa-Garba case

    Delport, Shannon; Gyuran, John; Knox, Shane; Batt, Alan M. (Mark Allen Group, 2018-11-06)

View more