Now showing items 1-20 of 27586

    • An Unusual Case of a Facial Guard Causing Penetrating Soft Tissue Injury in the Game of Hurling

      Farrell, T; McDonald, C.; Sheehan, E. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-02)
      Hurling is a fast-paced impact sport that is known to be associated with trauma to the head, face and hands1. Helmets with facial guards have been introduced by the Gaelic athletic association (GAA) in 2010 as a means of preventing head and maxillofacial injuries. Although the national safety authority of Ireland (NSAI) identify certain standards for hurling helmets, modifications are known to be quite common2. A recent study by O’Connor (2018) showed that 31% of players surveyed from a total of 304 had modified their helmet in some fashion either by changing the faceguard completely or removal of single bars. The main reasons given for modification were; restricted vision, comfort and perceived poor quality of the helmet/faceguard. Anecdotally, players may modify one’s helmet to help improve peripheral vision and thus situational awareness. In the literature, there exists only one case of penetrating injury from a facial guard of a hurling helmet3. The trend of modifying helmets seems to be increasing the incidence of these serious injuries. We believe that there is a general lack of awareness among players and officials as to the dangers of modifying protective equipment. We present the case of a penetrating hand injury as a direct result of a modified facial guard where a single bar was removed.
    • Healthy Weight for Children (0-6 years) Framework (November 2018)

      Jennings, Phil; Cooney, Fionnuala; Hegarty, Mary; Smith, Laura; HSE National Healthy Childhood Programme and HSE Healthy Eating Active Living Programme; The Healthy Weight for Children Group (2018-11)
    • Slow release oral morphine versus methadone for the treatment of opioid use disorder.

      Klimas, Jan; Gorfinkel, Lauren; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M; Ruckes, Christian; Socías, M Eugenia; Fairbairn, Nadia; Wood, Evan (2019-04-02)
      Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Data were pooled using the random-effects model and expressed as risk ratios (RRs) or mean differences with 95% CIs. Heterogeneity was assessed (χ2 statistic) and quantified (I2 statistic) and a sensitivity analysis was undertaken to assess the impact of particular high-risk trials.
    • Quantitative examination of the bone health status of older adults with intellectual and developmental disability in Ireland: a cross-sectional nationwide study.

      Burke, Éilish; Carroll, Rachael; O'Dwyer, Máire; Walsh, James Bernard; McCallion, Philip; McCarron, Mary (BMJ Open, 2019-04-15)
    • Managing the link and strengthening transition from child to adult mental health Care in Europe (MILESTONE): background, rationale and methodology.

      Tuomainen, H; Schulze, U; Warwick, J; Paul, M; Dieleman, G C; Franić, T; Madan, J; Maras, A; McNicholas, F; Purper-Ouakil, D; Santosh, P; Signorini, G; Street, C; Tremmery, S; Verhulst, F C; Wolke, D; Singh, S P (BMC Psychiatry, 2018-06-04)
    • Implementation Toolkit for the Food, Nutrition and Hydration Policy For Adult Patients in Acute Hospitals

      Health Service Executive (HSE); Nutrition Policy Development Group. (Health Service Executive (HSE), 2019-01)
    • The Burden of Severe Lactational Mastitis in Ireland from 2006 to 2015

      Cooney, F; Petty-Saphon, N; Department of Public Health, Dr Steevens' Hospital (irish Medical Journal, 2019-01-15)
    • A Case of Paget-Schroetter Syndrome in a Young Male After Lifting Weights

      Umana, E.; Elsherif, M.; Binchy, J. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-02)
      Paget-Schroetter Syndrome (PSS) or effort thrombosis of the axillary-subclavian venous axis is a rare disease affecting healthy young adults which requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Management often requires not only anticoagulation but also thrombolysis with first rib resection to prevent recurrence and complications. We present a case of a 31-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with pain and swelling of his left upper limb. He was diagnosed with PSS and underwent; anticoagulation, catheter directed thrombolysis and planned for first rib resection.
    • Kicking off a Retropharyngeal Abscess

      Rana, A; Heffernen, L; Binchy, J (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-03)
      Retropharyngeal abscesses (RPA) are deep neck space infections that can pose an immediate life-threatening emergency, such as airway obstruction. [1] The potential space can become infected by bacteria spreading from a contiguous area [2] or direct inoculation from penetrating trauma. [3] Infection is often polymicrobial (most commonly group A beta-hemolytic streptococci). [4
    • Meconium Ileus in Two Irish Newborns: The Presenting Feature of Cystic Fibrosis

      Smith, A.; Ryan, E; O’Keeffe, D; O’Donovan, D. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-03)
      Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetically inherited disease in Ireland1. Approximately 1/ 2,300 infants per year are born with CF in Ireland2. Newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) screening for CF was introduced to Ireland in 20113. NBS screening for CF is associated with improved lung function, nutritional status and increased survival into early adulthood4. Therefore early recognition and management of this chronic condition is vital to ensuring optimal patient management.
    • Ustekinumab-induced subacute cutaneous lupus.

      Tierney, Emma; Kirthi, Shivashini; Ramsay, Bart; Ahmad, Kashif (JAAD Case Reports, 2019-03-01)
      Drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE) is a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure. DILE can be divided into systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) and chronic cutaneous lupus.1 Hydrochlorothiazide was the first drug associated with SCLE in 1985,2 but at least 100 other agents have since been reported to induce/exacerbate SCLE, with terbinafine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors, antiepileptics, and proton pump inhibitors, the most frequently associated medications. We present a case of ustekinumab-induced SCLE in a patient being treated for psoriasis.
    • Lacking evidence for the association between frequent urine drug screening and health outcomes of persons on opioid agonist therapy.

      McEachern, Jasmine; Adye-White, Lauren; Priest, Kelsey C; Moss, Eloise; Gorfinkel, Lauren; Wood, Evan; Cullen, Walter; Klimas, Jan (2019-02-01)
      Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD); however, the efficacy and role of urine drug screening (UDS) in OAT has received little research attention. Prior evidence suggests that UDS frequency reflects philosophy and practice context rather than differences in patient characteristics or clinical need. Therefore, we reviewed the literature on the effect of and recommendations for the frequency of UDS on health outcomes for persons with OUD who receive OAT. We searched Medline and EMBASE for articles published from 1995-2017. Search results underwent double, independent review with discrepancies resolved through discussion with a third reviewer, when necessary. Additional articles were identified through snowball searching, hand searching (Google Scholar), and expert consultation. The Cochrane tool was used to assess risk of bias. Of the 60 potentially eligible articles reviewed, only one three-arm randomized open-label trial, comparing weekly and monthly UDS testing with take-home OAT doses, met our inclusion criteria. Our review identified an urgent gap in research evidence underpinning an area of clinical importance and that is routinely reported by patients as an area of concern.
    • Perspectives of people with aphasia poststroke towards personal recovery and living successfully: A systematic review and thematic synthesis

      Manning, Molly; MacFarlane, Anne; Hickey, Anne; Franklin, Sue; School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick (Plos One, 2019-03)
    • A comparative analysis of prophylactic antimicrobial use in long-term care facilities in Ireland, 2013 and 2016

      Tandan, Meera; O'Connor, Rory; Burns, Karen; Murphy, Helen; Hennessy, Sarah; Roche, Fiona; Donlon, Sheila; Cormican, Martin; Vellinga, Akke (Eurosurveillance, 2019-03)
    • Evaluation of the Design & Dignity Programme

      Cornally, N; Cagney, O; Burton, A; Coffey, A; Dalton, C; Hartigan, I; Harrison, J; Murphy, M; Nuzum, D; Pennisi, Y; Savage, E; Sweeney, C; Timmons, S; Leahy Warren, P; FitzGerald, S; University College Cork, Cork (Irish Hospice Foundation (IHF), 2019-03)
    • Excellent reliability and validity of the Addiction Medicine Training Need Assessment Scale across four countries.

      Pinxten, W J Lucas; Fitriana, Efi; De Jong, Cor; Klimas, Jan; Tobin, Helen; Barry, Tomas; Cullen, Walter; Jokubonis, Darius; Mazaliauskiene, Ramune; Iskandar, Shelly; Raya, Reynie Purnama; Schellekens, Arnt (2019-04-01)
      Addiction is a context specific but common and devastating condition. Though several evidence-based treatments are available, many of them remain under-utilized, among others due to the lack of adequate training in addiction medicine (AM). AM Training needs may differ across countries because of difference in discipline and level of prior AM training or contextual factors like epidemiology and availability of treatment. For appropriate testing of training needs, reliability and validity are key issues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the AM-TNA Scale: an instrument specifically designed to develop the competence-based curriculum of the Indonesian AM course. In a cross-sectional study in Indonesia, Ireland, Lithuania and the Netherlands the AM-TNA was distributed among a convenience sample of health professionals working in addiction care in The Netherlands, Lithuania, Indonesia and General Practitioners in-training in Ireland. 428 respondents completed the AM-TNA scale. To assess the factor structure, we used explorative factor analysis. Reliability was tested using Cronbach's Alpha, ANOVA determined the discriminative validity. Validity: factor analysis revealed a two-factor structure: One on providing direct patient treatment and care (Factor 1: clinical) and one factor on facilitating/supporting direct patient treatment and care (Factor 2: non-clinical) AM competencies and a cumulative 76% explained variance. Reliability: Factor 1 α = 0.983 and Factor 2: α = 0.956, while overall reliability was (α = 0.986). The AM-TNA was able to differentiate training needs across groups of AM professionals on all 30 addiction medicine competencies (P = .001). In our study the AM-TNA scale had a strong two-factor structure and proofed to be a reliable and valid instrument. The next step should be the testing external validity, strengthening discriminant validity and assessing the re-test effect and measuring changes over time.
    • Association between caesarean section delivery and obesity in childhood: a longitudinal cohort study in Ireland.

      Masukume, Gwinyai; McCarthy, Fergus P; Baker, Philip N; Kenny, Louise C; Morton, Susan Mb; Murray, Deirdre M; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; Khashan, Ali S (BMJ Open, 2019-03-15)
      To investigate the association between caesarean section (CS) birth and body fat percentage (BF%), body mass index (BMI) and being overweight or obese in early childhood. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Babies After Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints: Evaluating the Longitudinal Impact on Neurological and Nutritional Endpoints cohort. Infants born to mothers recruited from the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints study, Cork University Maternity Hospital between November 2007 and February 2011.
    • What are the training needs of early career professionals in addiction medicine? A BEME Scoping Review protocol

      Kelly, D; Adam, A; Arya, S; Indave, I; Krupchanka, D; Wood, E; Cullen, W; Klimas, Jan (BEME, 2018)